Downlink capacity and base station density in cellular networks

Seung Min Yu, Seong Lyun Kim

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

128 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There have been a bulk of analytic results about the performance of cellular networks where base stations are regularly located on a hexagonal or square lattice. This regular model cannot reflect the reality, and tends to overestimate the network performance. Moreover, tractable analysis can be performed only for a fixed location user (e.g., cell center or edge user). In this paper, we use the stochastic geometry approach, where base stations can be modeled as a homogeneous Poisson point process. We also consider the user density, and derive the user outage probability that an arbitrary user is under outage owing to low signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio or high congestion by multiple users. Using the result, we calculate the density of success transmissions in the downlink cellular network. An interesting observation is that the success transmission density increases with the base station density, but the increasing rate diminishes. This means that the number of base stations installed should be more than n-times to increase the network capacity by a factor of n. Our results will provide a framework for performance analysis of the wireless infrastructure with a high density of access points, which will significantly reduce the burden of network-level simulations.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2013 11th International Symposium and Workshops on Modeling and Optimization in Mobile, Ad Hoc and Wireless Networks, WiOpt 2013
Pages119-124
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Sep 3
Event2013 11th International Symposium and Workshops on Modeling and Optimization in Mobile, Ad Hoc and Wireless Networks, WiOpt 2013 - Tsukuba Science City, Japan
Duration: 2013 May 132013 May 17

Other

Other2013 11th International Symposium and Workshops on Modeling and Optimization in Mobile, Ad Hoc and Wireless Networks, WiOpt 2013
CountryJapan
CityTsukuba Science City
Period13/5/1313/5/17

Fingerprint

Cellular Networks
Base stations
Outages
Network performance
Stochastic Geometry
Hexagonal Lattice
Poisson Point Process
Outage Probability
Network Performance
Square Lattice
Congestion
Performance Analysis
Geometry
Infrastructure
Interference
Tend
Calculate
Cell
Arbitrary
Simulation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Modelling and Simulation

Cite this

Yu, S. M., & Kim, S. L. (2013). Downlink capacity and base station density in cellular networks. In 2013 11th International Symposium and Workshops on Modeling and Optimization in Mobile, Ad Hoc and Wireless Networks, WiOpt 2013 (pp. 119-124). [6576422]
Yu, Seung Min ; Kim, Seong Lyun. / Downlink capacity and base station density in cellular networks. 2013 11th International Symposium and Workshops on Modeling and Optimization in Mobile, Ad Hoc and Wireless Networks, WiOpt 2013. 2013. pp. 119-124
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Yu, SM & Kim, SL 2013, Downlink capacity and base station density in cellular networks. in 2013 11th International Symposium and Workshops on Modeling and Optimization in Mobile, Ad Hoc and Wireless Networks, WiOpt 2013., 6576422, pp. 119-124, 2013 11th International Symposium and Workshops on Modeling and Optimization in Mobile, Ad Hoc and Wireless Networks, WiOpt 2013, Tsukuba Science City, Japan, 13/5/13.

Downlink capacity and base station density in cellular networks. / Yu, Seung Min; Kim, Seong Lyun.

2013 11th International Symposium and Workshops on Modeling and Optimization in Mobile, Ad Hoc and Wireless Networks, WiOpt 2013. 2013. p. 119-124 6576422.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Yu SM, Kim SL. Downlink capacity and base station density in cellular networks. In 2013 11th International Symposium and Workshops on Modeling and Optimization in Mobile, Ad Hoc and Wireless Networks, WiOpt 2013. 2013. p. 119-124. 6576422