Drag reduction using metallic engineered surfaces with highly ordered hierarchical topographies: Nanostructures on micro-riblets

Taekyung Kim, Ryung Shin, Myungki Jung, Jinhyung Lee, Changsu Park, Shinill Kang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Durable drag-reduction surfaces have recently received much attention, due to energy-saving and power-consumption issues associated with harsh environment applications, such as those experienced by piping infrastructure, ships, aviation, underwater vehicles, and high-speed ground vehicles. In this study, a durable, metallic surface with highly ordered hierarchical structures was used to enhance drag-reduction properties, by combining two passive drag-reduction strategies: an air-layer effect induced by nanostructures and secondary vortex generation by micro-riblet structures. The nanostructures and micro-riblet structures were designed to increase slip length. The top-down fabrication method used to form the metallic hierarchical structures combined laser interference lithography, photolithography, thermal reflow, nanoimprinting, and pulse-reverse-current electrochemical deposition. The surfaces were formed from nickel, which has high hardness and corrosion resistance, making it suitable for use in harsh environments. The drag-reduction properties of various metal surfaces were investigated based on the surface structure: a bare surface, a nanostructured surface, a micro-riblet surface, and a hierarchically structured surface of nanostructures on micro-riblets.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-152
Number of pages6
JournalApplied Surface Science
Volume367
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Mar 30

Fingerprint

Drag reduction
Topography
Nanostructures
Microstructure
Ground vehicles
Photolithography
Nickel
Surface structure
Lithography
Aviation
Corrosion resistance
Energy conservation
Ships
Vortex flow
Electric power utilization
Metals
Hardness
Fabrication
Lasers
Air

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

Cite this

Kim, Taekyung ; Shin, Ryung ; Jung, Myungki ; Lee, Jinhyung ; Park, Changsu ; Kang, Shinill. / Drag reduction using metallic engineered surfaces with highly ordered hierarchical topographies : Nanostructures on micro-riblets. In: Applied Surface Science. 2016 ; Vol. 367. pp. 147-152.
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Drag reduction using metallic engineered surfaces with highly ordered hierarchical topographies : Nanostructures on micro-riblets. / Kim, Taekyung; Shin, Ryung; Jung, Myungki; Lee, Jinhyung; Park, Changsu; Kang, Shinill.

In: Applied Surface Science, Vol. 367, 30.03.2016, p. 147-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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