Dysmobility syndrome is associated with prevalent morphometric vertebral fracture in older adults: the Korean Urban-Rural Elderly (KURE) study

Namki Hong, Chang Oh Kim, Yoosik Youm, Jin Young Choi, Hyeon Chang Kim, Yumie Rhee

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Abstract

Summary: In a community-dwelling elderly cohort, dysmobility syndrome was associated with elevated odds of morphometric vertebral fracture or any prevalent fracture, independent of age and covariates. Dysmobility syndrome improved discrimination for fracture when added to the FRAX score. Introduction: Dysmobility syndrome was coined to indicate patients with impaired musculoskeletal health. Data on the association of dysmobility syndrome with prevalent morphometric vertebral fracture (VF) in elderly persons are limited. Methods: A total of 1369 community-dwelling elderly subjects (mean age 71.6 years; women 66%) were analyzed. Dysmobility syndrome was defined as ≥ 3 components among falls, low lean mass, high fat mass, osteoporosis, low grip strength, and low timed get-up-and-go performance. VF was defined as a ≥ 25% reduction in the height of vertebral bodies in plain radiographs. Modified cutpoints of each component at which elevate the odds of fracture were investigated using receiver-operating characteristics analysis. Net reclassification improvement (NRI) and integrated discrimination index (IDI) were calculated to assess additive discriminatory value of dysmobility syndrome over FRAX. Results: The prevalence of VF and any fracture composite of VF and non-VF was 16% and 25%, respectively, increasing according to number of dysmobility components (from 0 to 5; VF 10–35%; any fracture 16–45%). Dysmobility syndrome was associated with elevated odds of VF (adjusted OR [aOR] 1.52, 95% CI 1.08–2.15) or any fracture (aOR 1.46, 95% CI 1.07–1.98) but no longer with non-VF (aOR 1.31, 95% CI 0.86–1.98) in multivariate model, whereas modified definition showed robust association with non-VF (aOR 1.79, 95% CI 1.23–2.60). Dysmobility syndrome improved discrimination for prevalent fracture when added to FRAX (NRI 0.25, 95% CI 0.13–0.37; IDI 0.020, 95% CI 0.014–0.026). Conclusions: Dysmobility syndrome was associated with elevated odds of morphometric VF in community-dwelling older adults, independent of age and covariates.

Original languageEnglish
Article number86
JournalArchives of Osteoporosis
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Dec 1

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Independent Living
Body Height
Hand Strength
ROC Curve
Osteoporosis
Fats
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

@article{fcf7b6415ebf4de9a975deb279cb2d6d,
title = "Dysmobility syndrome is associated with prevalent morphometric vertebral fracture in older adults: the Korean Urban-Rural Elderly (KURE) study",
abstract = "Summary: In a community-dwelling elderly cohort, dysmobility syndrome was associated with elevated odds of morphometric vertebral fracture or any prevalent fracture, independent of age and covariates. Dysmobility syndrome improved discrimination for fracture when added to the FRAX score. Introduction: Dysmobility syndrome was coined to indicate patients with impaired musculoskeletal health. Data on the association of dysmobility syndrome with prevalent morphometric vertebral fracture (VF) in elderly persons are limited. Methods: A total of 1369 community-dwelling elderly subjects (mean age 71.6 years; women 66{\%}) were analyzed. Dysmobility syndrome was defined as ≥ 3 components among falls, low lean mass, high fat mass, osteoporosis, low grip strength, and low timed get-up-and-go performance. VF was defined as a ≥ 25{\%} reduction in the height of vertebral bodies in plain radiographs. Modified cutpoints of each component at which elevate the odds of fracture were investigated using receiver-operating characteristics analysis. Net reclassification improvement (NRI) and integrated discrimination index (IDI) were calculated to assess additive discriminatory value of dysmobility syndrome over FRAX. Results: The prevalence of VF and any fracture composite of VF and non-VF was 16{\%} and 25{\%}, respectively, increasing according to number of dysmobility components (from 0 to 5; VF 10–35{\%}; any fracture 16–45{\%}). Dysmobility syndrome was associated with elevated odds of VF (adjusted OR [aOR] 1.52, 95{\%} CI 1.08–2.15) or any fracture (aOR 1.46, 95{\%} CI 1.07–1.98) but no longer with non-VF (aOR 1.31, 95{\%} CI 0.86–1.98) in multivariate model, whereas modified definition showed robust association with non-VF (aOR 1.79, 95{\%} CI 1.23–2.60). Dysmobility syndrome improved discrimination for prevalent fracture when added to FRAX (NRI 0.25, 95{\%} CI 0.13–0.37; IDI 0.020, 95{\%} CI 0.014–0.026). Conclusions: Dysmobility syndrome was associated with elevated odds of morphometric VF in community-dwelling older adults, independent of age and covariates.",
author = "Namki Hong and Kim, {Chang Oh} and Yoosik Youm and Choi, {Jin Young} and Kim, {Hyeon Chang} and Yumie Rhee",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s11657-018-0500-2",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
journal = "Archives of Osteoporosis",
issn = "1862-3522",
publisher = "Springer London",
number = "1",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Dysmobility syndrome is associated with prevalent morphometric vertebral fracture in older adults

T2 - the Korean Urban-Rural Elderly (KURE) study

AU - Hong, Namki

AU - Kim, Chang Oh

AU - Youm, Yoosik

AU - Choi, Jin Young

AU - Kim, Hyeon Chang

AU - Rhee, Yumie

PY - 2018/12/1

Y1 - 2018/12/1

N2 - Summary: In a community-dwelling elderly cohort, dysmobility syndrome was associated with elevated odds of morphometric vertebral fracture or any prevalent fracture, independent of age and covariates. Dysmobility syndrome improved discrimination for fracture when added to the FRAX score. Introduction: Dysmobility syndrome was coined to indicate patients with impaired musculoskeletal health. Data on the association of dysmobility syndrome with prevalent morphometric vertebral fracture (VF) in elderly persons are limited. Methods: A total of 1369 community-dwelling elderly subjects (mean age 71.6 years; women 66%) were analyzed. Dysmobility syndrome was defined as ≥ 3 components among falls, low lean mass, high fat mass, osteoporosis, low grip strength, and low timed get-up-and-go performance. VF was defined as a ≥ 25% reduction in the height of vertebral bodies in plain radiographs. Modified cutpoints of each component at which elevate the odds of fracture were investigated using receiver-operating characteristics analysis. Net reclassification improvement (NRI) and integrated discrimination index (IDI) were calculated to assess additive discriminatory value of dysmobility syndrome over FRAX. Results: The prevalence of VF and any fracture composite of VF and non-VF was 16% and 25%, respectively, increasing according to number of dysmobility components (from 0 to 5; VF 10–35%; any fracture 16–45%). Dysmobility syndrome was associated with elevated odds of VF (adjusted OR [aOR] 1.52, 95% CI 1.08–2.15) or any fracture (aOR 1.46, 95% CI 1.07–1.98) but no longer with non-VF (aOR 1.31, 95% CI 0.86–1.98) in multivariate model, whereas modified definition showed robust association with non-VF (aOR 1.79, 95% CI 1.23–2.60). Dysmobility syndrome improved discrimination for prevalent fracture when added to FRAX (NRI 0.25, 95% CI 0.13–0.37; IDI 0.020, 95% CI 0.014–0.026). Conclusions: Dysmobility syndrome was associated with elevated odds of morphometric VF in community-dwelling older adults, independent of age and covariates.

AB - Summary: In a community-dwelling elderly cohort, dysmobility syndrome was associated with elevated odds of morphometric vertebral fracture or any prevalent fracture, independent of age and covariates. Dysmobility syndrome improved discrimination for fracture when added to the FRAX score. Introduction: Dysmobility syndrome was coined to indicate patients with impaired musculoskeletal health. Data on the association of dysmobility syndrome with prevalent morphometric vertebral fracture (VF) in elderly persons are limited. Methods: A total of 1369 community-dwelling elderly subjects (mean age 71.6 years; women 66%) were analyzed. Dysmobility syndrome was defined as ≥ 3 components among falls, low lean mass, high fat mass, osteoporosis, low grip strength, and low timed get-up-and-go performance. VF was defined as a ≥ 25% reduction in the height of vertebral bodies in plain radiographs. Modified cutpoints of each component at which elevate the odds of fracture were investigated using receiver-operating characteristics analysis. Net reclassification improvement (NRI) and integrated discrimination index (IDI) were calculated to assess additive discriminatory value of dysmobility syndrome over FRAX. Results: The prevalence of VF and any fracture composite of VF and non-VF was 16% and 25%, respectively, increasing according to number of dysmobility components (from 0 to 5; VF 10–35%; any fracture 16–45%). Dysmobility syndrome was associated with elevated odds of VF (adjusted OR [aOR] 1.52, 95% CI 1.08–2.15) or any fracture (aOR 1.46, 95% CI 1.07–1.98) but no longer with non-VF (aOR 1.31, 95% CI 0.86–1.98) in multivariate model, whereas modified definition showed robust association with non-VF (aOR 1.79, 95% CI 1.23–2.60). Dysmobility syndrome improved discrimination for prevalent fracture when added to FRAX (NRI 0.25, 95% CI 0.13–0.37; IDI 0.020, 95% CI 0.014–0.026). Conclusions: Dysmobility syndrome was associated with elevated odds of morphometric VF in community-dwelling older adults, independent of age and covariates.

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