Early intervention in thyroidectomy scars

Demographics, symptoms, and prevention

J. U. Shin, J. H. Park, SangHo Oh, J. J. Jeong, S. Kang, K. Nam, W. Y. Chung, JuHee Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

• Objective: Although hypertrophic scars are cosmetically problematic for patients following thyroidectomy, the associated risk factors are not well defined. Our objective was to determine the factors associated with hypertrophic scar development following thyroidectomy. • Method: A retrospective chart review was performed collecting data on sex, age, body mass index (BMI), operation site, skin characteristics (pigmentation, erythema, elasticity, and hydration), and clinical scar characteristics (itching, tightening, induration, adhesion, and oedema). It was also noted if the patient had early scar intervention with intralesional steroid injection or non-ablative fractional laser irradiation, and preventive topical treatment agents. The effects of these factors were analysed using univariate and multivariate analyses. • Results: Data from 1141 patients showed the incidence of hypertrophic scars was 13.9%. Significant variables in univariate analysis were combined for multivariate analysis. Young age, high BMI, itching, tightening, induration, and adhesion were associated with hypertrophic scar formation. Early scar intervention, as well as the use of preventive topical agents, were associated with decreased hypertrophic scar formation. • Conclusion: Based on our results, we suggest that dermatologists consider using non-ablative fractional laser, intralesional steroid injection, and topical preventive agents to lower the incidence of hypertrophic scars, especially in young patients or those with high BMI and/or clinical symptoms such as itching, tightening, induration, and adhesion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)163-171
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of wound care
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

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Hypertrophic Cicatrix
Thyroidectomy
Cicatrix
Demography
Pruritus
Intralesional Injections
Body Mass Index
Lasers
Multivariate Analysis
Steroids
Skin Pigmentation
Incidence
Elasticity
Erythema
Edema

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Fundamentals and skills
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Shin, J. U. ; Park, J. H. ; Oh, SangHo ; Jeong, J. J. ; Kang, S. ; Nam, K. ; Chung, W. Y. ; Lee, JuHee. / Early intervention in thyroidectomy scars : Demographics, symptoms, and prevention. In: Journal of wound care. 2015 ; Vol. 24, No. 4. pp. 163-171.
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Early intervention in thyroidectomy scars : Demographics, symptoms, and prevention. / Shin, J. U.; Park, J. H.; Oh, SangHo; Jeong, J. J.; Kang, S.; Nam, K.; Chung, W. Y.; Lee, JuHee.

In: Journal of wound care, Vol. 24, No. 4, 01.01.2015, p. 163-171.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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