Eccentricity biases of object categories are evident in visual working memory

Sang Ah Yoo, Sang Chul Chong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In high-order object areas, face-selective areas prefer centrally presented stimuli, whereas building-selective areas prefer peripherally presented stimuli (Levy et al., 2001). We investigated whether this eccentricity bias was also evident in visual working memory. In Experiment 1, we found that working memory performance for faces decreased towards the periphery while the performance for buildings remained unchanged across different eccentricities. To rule out the possibility that lower level features influence these results, we manipulated the spatial frequency of faces and buildings (Experiment 2) and the spatial layout information of the buildings (Experiment 3). In both of the experiments, we replicated the results of Experiment 1, even when these lower level features of stimuli were controlled. Consistent with previous findings, the current results suggest that each object category is processed in a different manner depending on the eccentricity. This eccentricity bias is likely the result of how the high-order object areas represent different object categories.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)233-243
Number of pages11
JournalVisual Cognition
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Mar 1

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Short-Term Memory
Visual Working Memory
Eccentricity
Experiment
Stimulus

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

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Eccentricity biases of object categories are evident in visual working memory. / Yoo, Sang Ah; Chong, Sang Chul.

In: Visual Cognition, Vol. 20, No. 3, 01.03.2012, p. 233-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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