Ecological correlates of substance use in African American adolescents living in public housing communities: Assessing the moderating effects of social cohesion

Von E. Nebbitt, Margaret Lombe, Mansoo Yu, Michael G. Vaughn, Charu Stokes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adolescence is a stage of development when young people explore the larger social world. Accordingly, exposure to violence and other risk factors increase during adolescence. Exposure to community and domestic violence in addition to other contextual and individual correlates have been found associated with substance use. Using a sample of 663 African American adolescents living in urban public housing, this study assesses how multiple risk factors, including for example violence and peers' behavior, are related to adolescents' alcohol, tobacco and marijuana use. This paper also assesses how, or whether, these relationships are moderated by social cohesion. The model explained 28% of the variance in substance use. Mental health symptoms in addition to violence were significantly associated with substance use. These effects, however, were dependent upon levels of social cohesion. Implications to practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)338-347
Number of pages10
JournalChildren and Youth Services Review
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Feb

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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