Economic and patient-reported outcomes of outpatient home-based versus inpatient hospital-based chemotherapy for patients with colorectal cancer

Eun Hye Joo, Sun Young Rha, Joong Bae Ahn, Hye Young Kang

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8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose This study aims to compare the economic-and patient-reported outcomes between outpatient home-based and inpatient hospital-based chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer patients. Methods A total of 80 patients from Severance Hospital in Seoul, Korea, who had stage III colorectal cancer and underwent home-based (n=40) or hospital-based chemotherapy (n=40) with a FOLFOX regimen between January 2007 and April 2008 were enrolled. Patient satisfaction data were collected by a self-administered questionnaire survey. Based on hospital charge records, average cost (in 2008 Korean won (KW)) per chemotherapy session was estimated and compared between home-and hospital-based chemotherapy from a societal perspective. Results Patients receiving chemotherapy at home showed higher satisfaction with their treatment (mean satisfaction score 3.58±0.15, 5-point Likert-type scale, with a higher score indicating higher satisfaction) than did those treated at the hospital (3.23±0.21; p<0.01). After adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups using multivariate analysis, those receiving home-based chemotherapy still showed significantly higher satisfaction than those undergoing hospital-based therapy (ß=0.271, p<0.001). Additionally, home-based therapy reduced the cost per chemotherapy session by 16.6%, compared with hospital-based treatment (1,694,216 versus 2,030,383 KW, 1,200 KW-1 US dollar). The largest cost reduction was attributable to medical costs (-201,122 KW), followed by caregiver's opportunity costs (-135,000 KW). Conclusions Higher satisfaction and lower economic cost for home-based chemotherapy suggests that home-based chemotherapy could be a popular and cost-effective treatment option for colorectal cancer patients who are eligible for home-based chemotherapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)971-978
Number of pages8
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume19
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Jul 1

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Inpatients
Colorectal Neoplasms
Outpatients
Economics
Drug Therapy
Costs and Cost Analysis
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Hospital Charges
Hospital Records
Therapeutics
Korea
Patient Satisfaction
Health Care Costs
Caregivers
Multivariate Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology

Cite this

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title = "Economic and patient-reported outcomes of outpatient home-based versus inpatient hospital-based chemotherapy for patients with colorectal cancer",
abstract = "Purpose This study aims to compare the economic-and patient-reported outcomes between outpatient home-based and inpatient hospital-based chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer patients. Methods A total of 80 patients from Severance Hospital in Seoul, Korea, who had stage III colorectal cancer and underwent home-based (n=40) or hospital-based chemotherapy (n=40) with a FOLFOX regimen between January 2007 and April 2008 were enrolled. Patient satisfaction data were collected by a self-administered questionnaire survey. Based on hospital charge records, average cost (in 2008 Korean won (KW)) per chemotherapy session was estimated and compared between home-and hospital-based chemotherapy from a societal perspective. Results Patients receiving chemotherapy at home showed higher satisfaction with their treatment (mean satisfaction score 3.58±0.15, 5-point Likert-type scale, with a higher score indicating higher satisfaction) than did those treated at the hospital (3.23±0.21; p<0.01). After adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups using multivariate analysis, those receiving home-based chemotherapy still showed significantly higher satisfaction than those undergoing hospital-based therapy ({\ss}=0.271, p<0.001). Additionally, home-based therapy reduced the cost per chemotherapy session by 16.6{\%}, compared with hospital-based treatment (1,694,216 versus 2,030,383 KW, 1,200 KW-1 US dollar). The largest cost reduction was attributable to medical costs (-201,122 KW), followed by caregiver's opportunity costs (-135,000 KW). Conclusions Higher satisfaction and lower economic cost for home-based chemotherapy suggests that home-based chemotherapy could be a popular and cost-effective treatment option for colorectal cancer patients who are eligible for home-based chemotherapy.",
author = "Joo, {Eun Hye} and Rha, {Sun Young} and Ahn, {Joong Bae} and Kang, {Hye Young}",
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T1 - Economic and patient-reported outcomes of outpatient home-based versus inpatient hospital-based chemotherapy for patients with colorectal cancer

AU - Joo, Eun Hye

AU - Rha, Sun Young

AU - Ahn, Joong Bae

AU - Kang, Hye Young

PY - 2011/7/1

Y1 - 2011/7/1

N2 - Purpose This study aims to compare the economic-and patient-reported outcomes between outpatient home-based and inpatient hospital-based chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer patients. Methods A total of 80 patients from Severance Hospital in Seoul, Korea, who had stage III colorectal cancer and underwent home-based (n=40) or hospital-based chemotherapy (n=40) with a FOLFOX regimen between January 2007 and April 2008 were enrolled. Patient satisfaction data were collected by a self-administered questionnaire survey. Based on hospital charge records, average cost (in 2008 Korean won (KW)) per chemotherapy session was estimated and compared between home-and hospital-based chemotherapy from a societal perspective. Results Patients receiving chemotherapy at home showed higher satisfaction with their treatment (mean satisfaction score 3.58±0.15, 5-point Likert-type scale, with a higher score indicating higher satisfaction) than did those treated at the hospital (3.23±0.21; p<0.01). After adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups using multivariate analysis, those receiving home-based chemotherapy still showed significantly higher satisfaction than those undergoing hospital-based therapy (ß=0.271, p<0.001). Additionally, home-based therapy reduced the cost per chemotherapy session by 16.6%, compared with hospital-based treatment (1,694,216 versus 2,030,383 KW, 1,200 KW-1 US dollar). The largest cost reduction was attributable to medical costs (-201,122 KW), followed by caregiver's opportunity costs (-135,000 KW). Conclusions Higher satisfaction and lower economic cost for home-based chemotherapy suggests that home-based chemotherapy could be a popular and cost-effective treatment option for colorectal cancer patients who are eligible for home-based chemotherapy.

AB - Purpose This study aims to compare the economic-and patient-reported outcomes between outpatient home-based and inpatient hospital-based chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer patients. Methods A total of 80 patients from Severance Hospital in Seoul, Korea, who had stage III colorectal cancer and underwent home-based (n=40) or hospital-based chemotherapy (n=40) with a FOLFOX regimen between January 2007 and April 2008 were enrolled. Patient satisfaction data were collected by a self-administered questionnaire survey. Based on hospital charge records, average cost (in 2008 Korean won (KW)) per chemotherapy session was estimated and compared between home-and hospital-based chemotherapy from a societal perspective. Results Patients receiving chemotherapy at home showed higher satisfaction with their treatment (mean satisfaction score 3.58±0.15, 5-point Likert-type scale, with a higher score indicating higher satisfaction) than did those treated at the hospital (3.23±0.21; p<0.01). After adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups using multivariate analysis, those receiving home-based chemotherapy still showed significantly higher satisfaction than those undergoing hospital-based therapy (ß=0.271, p<0.001). Additionally, home-based therapy reduced the cost per chemotherapy session by 16.6%, compared with hospital-based treatment (1,694,216 versus 2,030,383 KW, 1,200 KW-1 US dollar). The largest cost reduction was attributable to medical costs (-201,122 KW), followed by caregiver's opportunity costs (-135,000 KW). Conclusions Higher satisfaction and lower economic cost for home-based chemotherapy suggests that home-based chemotherapy could be a popular and cost-effective treatment option for colorectal cancer patients who are eligible for home-based chemotherapy.

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