Effect of Group Contingency Type on Walking: Comparisons of Effectiveness and Cost Efficiency

Heewon Kim, Changseok Lee, Seoi Lee, Kyong Mee Chung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Group contingency (GC) is an effective and cost-efficient strategy that can be successfully applied to technology-based interventions. This study examined the relative effectiveness and cost efficiency of three types of technology-based group contingencies on walking among adults. Seventy two students were divided into teams of three. Each team was randomly assigned to one of three GC conditions (independent, interdependent, or dependent) and underwent 66 days of technology-based group contingency intervention. Sixty five participants completed the intervention and 61 completed the follow-up assessment 2 months later. Step counts and self-reported walking activity increased after the intervention under all three conditions. The proportion of participants that met the target step counts was significantly higher under the dependent group contingency condition. However, 2 months later, intervention effects were not maintained under any condition. For cost efficiency, the increase in step count per point was significantly higher under the interdependent group contingency condition. Group cohesion and social validity (point satisfaction and point utility) were significantly higher under the dependent group contingency condition. Finally, the clinical implications and limitations of this study are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number655663
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 May 28

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported by the Ministry of Science and ICT of the South Korea and the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF-2017M3C4A7083533).

Publisher Copyright:
© Copyright © 2021 Kim, Lee, Lee and Chung.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

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