Effect of Topical Anesthesia on Pain from Needle Insertion and Injection and Its Relationship with Anxiety in Patients Awaiting Apical Surgery: A Randomized Double-blind Clinical Trial

Sin Yeon Cho, EuiSeong Kim, Sungho Park, Byoung Duck Roh, Chan Young Lee, Seung Jong Lee, Il Young Jung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction We aimed to simultaneously investigate the effects of topical anesthesia on needle insertion and injection pain in the labial mucosa of the maxillary central incisors of patients awaiting apical surgery and to assess the relationship between patients' anxiety and pain scores. Methods Forty-four patients scheduled for apical surgery of the maxillary anterior incisor or canine were included, and all completed the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) questionnaire. One piece of Xylocaine (AstraZeneca, Sodertalje, Sweden) gauze was applied to the right or left side of the labial vestibule below the central incisor according to a randomization process, and 1 piece of water gauze was applied to the contralateral side of the labial vestibule. Each piece of gauze remained in place for 2 minutes. The subjects were asked to rate their pain according to the numeric rating scale immediately after needle insertion and anesthetic solution injection. Results Topical anesthetic application significantly reduced both insertion- and injection-related pain. Injection pain was significantly higher than insertion pain throughout the experiment. The difference in pain scores between the placebo and topical anesthetic groups was significantly greater for insertion pain than injection pain. The group with higher MDAS scores showed significantly higher pain scores, except for insertion pain reported by the topical anesthetic group, which did not show a significant difference between MDAS score groups. Conclusions The topical anesthetic was highly effective for both insertion and injection pain during infiltration anesthesia in the maxillary central incisors. Highly anxious patients reported higher pain scores; however, topical anesthetics reduced the effect of anxiety on increasing pain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)364-369
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Endodontics
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Mar 1

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Needles
Anxiety
Anesthesia
Clinical Trials
Pain
Injections
Local Anesthetics
Dental Anxiety
Incisor
Lip
Anesthetics
Local Anesthesia
Random Allocation
Lidocaine
Sweden
Canidae
Mucous Membrane
Placebos

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

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title = "Effect of Topical Anesthesia on Pain from Needle Insertion and Injection and Its Relationship with Anxiety in Patients Awaiting Apical Surgery: A Randomized Double-blind Clinical Trial",
abstract = "Introduction We aimed to simultaneously investigate the effects of topical anesthesia on needle insertion and injection pain in the labial mucosa of the maxillary central incisors of patients awaiting apical surgery and to assess the relationship between patients' anxiety and pain scores. Methods Forty-four patients scheduled for apical surgery of the maxillary anterior incisor or canine were included, and all completed the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) questionnaire. One piece of Xylocaine (AstraZeneca, Sodertalje, Sweden) gauze was applied to the right or left side of the labial vestibule below the central incisor according to a randomization process, and 1 piece of water gauze was applied to the contralateral side of the labial vestibule. Each piece of gauze remained in place for 2 minutes. The subjects were asked to rate their pain according to the numeric rating scale immediately after needle insertion and anesthetic solution injection. Results Topical anesthetic application significantly reduced both insertion- and injection-related pain. Injection pain was significantly higher than insertion pain throughout the experiment. The difference in pain scores between the placebo and topical anesthetic groups was significantly greater for insertion pain than injection pain. The group with higher MDAS scores showed significantly higher pain scores, except for insertion pain reported by the topical anesthetic group, which did not show a significant difference between MDAS score groups. Conclusions The topical anesthetic was highly effective for both insertion and injection pain during infiltration anesthesia in the maxillary central incisors. Highly anxious patients reported higher pain scores; however, topical anesthetics reduced the effect of anxiety on increasing pain.",
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Effect of Topical Anesthesia on Pain from Needle Insertion and Injection and Its Relationship with Anxiety in Patients Awaiting Apical Surgery : A Randomized Double-blind Clinical Trial. / Cho, Sin Yeon; Kim, EuiSeong; Park, Sungho; Roh, Byoung Duck; Lee, Chan Young; Lee, Seung Jong; Jung, Il Young.

In: Journal of Endodontics, Vol. 43, No. 3, 01.03.2017, p. 364-369.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T2 - A Randomized Double-blind Clinical Trial

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AU - Jung, Il Young

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