Effectiveness of Telephone-Delivered Interventions Following Suicide Attempts

A Systematic Review

Dabok Noh, Young Su Park, Euigeum Oh

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To evaluate efficacy of telephone-delivered interventions following suicide attempts. Methods: Systematic review, meta-analysis, and narrative synthesis. Results: Five papers evaluating telephone interventions were included. Three studies provided suicide attempters with telephone contact intervention, and two studies provided deliberate self-harm patients with crisis cards to help after discharge. Meta-analyses showed that telephone contact intervention did not significantly reduce further suicide attempts and completed suicides, and the crisis card did not significantly reduce further deliberate self-harm. Conclusion: Telephone-delivered interventions have been suggested as an alternative to face-to-face psychotherapy, but their effectiveness in reducing the recurrence of suicide attempts is not supported.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)114-119
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Psychiatric Nursing
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Feb 1

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Telephone
Suicide
Self-Injurious Behavior
Meta-Analysis
Psychotherapy
Recurrence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Phychiatric Mental Health

Cite this

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Effectiveness of Telephone-Delivered Interventions Following Suicide Attempts : A Systematic Review. / Noh, Dabok; Park, Young Su; Oh, Euigeum.

In: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, Vol. 30, No. 1, 01.02.2016, p. 114-119.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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