Effects of a proximity-sensing feedback chair on head, shoulder, and trunk postures when working at a visual display terminal

Won Gyu Yoo, Chunghwi Yi, Min Hee Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: This study was designed to identify the effects of feedback from a proximity-sensing chair on head, shoulder, and trunk postures when working at a visual display terminal (VDT). Methods: Twenty healthy adults were asked to perform VDT work, and their forward head, forward shoulder, and trunk flexion angles were analyzed using a 3-D motion analysis system. The statistical significance of differences between without and with an auditory feedback device was tested by paired t-tests, with the significance cutoff set at α=0.05. Results: The forward head, forward shoulder, and trunk flexion angles significantly decreased during VDT work when using the proximity sensor with auditory feedback. Conclusion: We suggest that a feedback device promotes the adoption of beneficial postures, which may be effective in preventing VDT-work-related neck and upper-limb disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)631-637
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Occupational Rehabilitation
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Dec 1

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Posture
Equipment and Supplies
Upper Extremity
Neck
selenium disulfide

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation
  • Occupational Therapy

Cite this

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Effects of a proximity-sensing feedback chair on head, shoulder, and trunk postures when working at a visual display terminal. / Yoo, Won Gyu; Yi, Chunghwi; Kim, Min Hee.

In: Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation, Vol. 16, No. 4, 01.12.2006, p. 631-637.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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