Effects of antirheumatic therapy on serum lipid levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A prospective study

Yong Beom Park, Hyon K. Choi, Min Young Kim, Won Ki Lee, Jungsik Song, Dong Kee Kim, Soo Kon Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

156 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Patients with newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis have adverse serum lipid profiles. We sought to determine the effects of treating rheumatoid arthritis with antirheumatic drugs on these abnormal lipid levels. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We studied 42 patients with newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis who had not been treated with corticosteroids or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. We measured serum lipid profiles at baseline and 1 year later, and determined whether there were differences in the changes in lipid levels between patients who met the American College of Rheumatology criteria for a 20% improvement in rheumatoid arthritis and those who did not. RESULTS: Of the 42 patients, 27 (64%) met the criteria for a 20% improvement in rheumatoid arthritis during the 12-month study. In these patients, mean high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels increased by 21% (P < 0.001), apolipoprotein A-I levels increased by 23% (P < 0.001), and the ratio of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol to HDL cholesterol level decreased by 13% (P = 0.10). There were significant between-group differences (responders-nonresponders) in the mean 12-month changes in HDL cholesterol levels (8.0 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3 to 13 mg/dL; P = 0.002), apolipoprotein A-I levels (21 mg/dL; 95% CI: 8 to 33 mg/dL; P = 0.003), and the LDL cholesterol to HDL cholesterol ratio (-0.6; 95% CI: -0.1 to -1.0; P = 0.03), but not in LDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein B-100, or lipoprotein(a) levels. CONCLUSION: Active rheumatoid arthritis is associated with an adverse lipid profile that improves substantially following effective treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This improvement may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)188-193
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Medicine
Volume113
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002 Aug 15

Fingerprint

Rheumatoid Arthritis
Prospective Studies
Lipids
HDL Cholesterol
Serum
LDL Cholesterol
Antirheumatic Agents
Apolipoprotein A-I
Confidence Intervals
Therapeutics
Apolipoprotein B-100
Lipoprotein(a)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Cardiovascular Diseases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Park, Yong Beom ; Choi, Hyon K. ; Kim, Min Young ; Lee, Won Ki ; Song, Jungsik ; Kim, Dong Kee ; Lee, Soo Kon. / Effects of antirheumatic therapy on serum lipid levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis : A prospective study. In: American Journal of Medicine. 2002 ; Vol. 113, No. 3. pp. 188-193.
@article{7b5419738da34ba6bc8ea5e41b4ce72c,
title = "Effects of antirheumatic therapy on serum lipid levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A prospective study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Patients with newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis have adverse serum lipid profiles. We sought to determine the effects of treating rheumatoid arthritis with antirheumatic drugs on these abnormal lipid levels. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We studied 42 patients with newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis who had not been treated with corticosteroids or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. We measured serum lipid profiles at baseline and 1 year later, and determined whether there were differences in the changes in lipid levels between patients who met the American College of Rheumatology criteria for a 20{\%} improvement in rheumatoid arthritis and those who did not. RESULTS: Of the 42 patients, 27 (64{\%}) met the criteria for a 20{\%} improvement in rheumatoid arthritis during the 12-month study. In these patients, mean high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels increased by 21{\%} (P < 0.001), apolipoprotein A-I levels increased by 23{\%} (P < 0.001), and the ratio of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol to HDL cholesterol level decreased by 13{\%} (P = 0.10). There were significant between-group differences (responders-nonresponders) in the mean 12-month changes in HDL cholesterol levels (8.0 mg/dL; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 3 to 13 mg/dL; P = 0.002), apolipoprotein A-I levels (21 mg/dL; 95{\%} CI: 8 to 33 mg/dL; P = 0.003), and the LDL cholesterol to HDL cholesterol ratio (-0.6; 95{\%} CI: -0.1 to -1.0; P = 0.03), but not in LDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein B-100, or lipoprotein(a) levels. CONCLUSION: Active rheumatoid arthritis is associated with an adverse lipid profile that improves substantially following effective treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This improvement may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.",
author = "Park, {Yong Beom} and Choi, {Hyon K.} and Kim, {Min Young} and Lee, {Won Ki} and Jungsik Song and Kim, {Dong Kee} and Lee, {Soo Kon}",
year = "2002",
month = "8",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/S0002-9343(02)01186-5",
language = "English",
volume = "113",
pages = "188--193",
journal = "American Journal of Medicine",
issn = "0002-9343",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "3",

}

Effects of antirheumatic therapy on serum lipid levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis : A prospective study. / Park, Yong Beom; Choi, Hyon K.; Kim, Min Young; Lee, Won Ki; Song, Jungsik; Kim, Dong Kee; Lee, Soo Kon.

In: American Journal of Medicine, Vol. 113, No. 3, 15.08.2002, p. 188-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of antirheumatic therapy on serum lipid levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

T2 - A prospective study

AU - Park, Yong Beom

AU - Choi, Hyon K.

AU - Kim, Min Young

AU - Lee, Won Ki

AU - Song, Jungsik

AU - Kim, Dong Kee

AU - Lee, Soo Kon

PY - 2002/8/15

Y1 - 2002/8/15

N2 - BACKGROUND: Patients with newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis have adverse serum lipid profiles. We sought to determine the effects of treating rheumatoid arthritis with antirheumatic drugs on these abnormal lipid levels. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We studied 42 patients with newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis who had not been treated with corticosteroids or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. We measured serum lipid profiles at baseline and 1 year later, and determined whether there were differences in the changes in lipid levels between patients who met the American College of Rheumatology criteria for a 20% improvement in rheumatoid arthritis and those who did not. RESULTS: Of the 42 patients, 27 (64%) met the criteria for a 20% improvement in rheumatoid arthritis during the 12-month study. In these patients, mean high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels increased by 21% (P < 0.001), apolipoprotein A-I levels increased by 23% (P < 0.001), and the ratio of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol to HDL cholesterol level decreased by 13% (P = 0.10). There were significant between-group differences (responders-nonresponders) in the mean 12-month changes in HDL cholesterol levels (8.0 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3 to 13 mg/dL; P = 0.002), apolipoprotein A-I levels (21 mg/dL; 95% CI: 8 to 33 mg/dL; P = 0.003), and the LDL cholesterol to HDL cholesterol ratio (-0.6; 95% CI: -0.1 to -1.0; P = 0.03), but not in LDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein B-100, or lipoprotein(a) levels. CONCLUSION: Active rheumatoid arthritis is associated with an adverse lipid profile that improves substantially following effective treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This improvement may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

AB - BACKGROUND: Patients with newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis have adverse serum lipid profiles. We sought to determine the effects of treating rheumatoid arthritis with antirheumatic drugs on these abnormal lipid levels. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We studied 42 patients with newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis who had not been treated with corticosteroids or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. We measured serum lipid profiles at baseline and 1 year later, and determined whether there were differences in the changes in lipid levels between patients who met the American College of Rheumatology criteria for a 20% improvement in rheumatoid arthritis and those who did not. RESULTS: Of the 42 patients, 27 (64%) met the criteria for a 20% improvement in rheumatoid arthritis during the 12-month study. In these patients, mean high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels increased by 21% (P < 0.001), apolipoprotein A-I levels increased by 23% (P < 0.001), and the ratio of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol to HDL cholesterol level decreased by 13% (P = 0.10). There were significant between-group differences (responders-nonresponders) in the mean 12-month changes in HDL cholesterol levels (8.0 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3 to 13 mg/dL; P = 0.002), apolipoprotein A-I levels (21 mg/dL; 95% CI: 8 to 33 mg/dL; P = 0.003), and the LDL cholesterol to HDL cholesterol ratio (-0.6; 95% CI: -0.1 to -1.0; P = 0.03), but not in LDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein B-100, or lipoprotein(a) levels. CONCLUSION: Active rheumatoid arthritis is associated with an adverse lipid profile that improves substantially following effective treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This improvement may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037102007&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037102007&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0002-9343(02)01186-5

DO - 10.1016/S0002-9343(02)01186-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 12208376

AN - SCOPUS:0037102007

VL - 113

SP - 188

EP - 193

JO - American Journal of Medicine

JF - American Journal of Medicine

SN - 0002-9343

IS - 3

ER -