Effects of computer-based practice on the acquisition and maintenance of basic academic skills for children with moderate to intensive educational needs

Julie M. Everhart, Sheila R. Alber-Morgan, Ju Hee Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of computer-based practice on the acquisition and maintenance of basic academic skills for two children with moderate to intensive disabilities. The special education teacher created individualized computer games that enabled the participants to independently practice academic skills that corresponded with their IEP objectives (e.g., letter-sound correspondence, word identification, number identification). The computer games provided discrete learning trials with immediate feedback for each response. A multiple baseline across skills design demonstrated that computer-based practice resulted in the successful acquisition of basic academic skills for both participants. Additionally, both participants maintained at least two mastered skills for two to four weeks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)556-564
Number of pages9
JournalEducation and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilities
Volume46
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Dec 1

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Video Games
Maintenance
computer game
Special Education
Learning
special education
disability
teacher
learning

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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