Effects of continuous positive airway pressure therapy on left ventricular diastolic function: A randomised, shamcontrolled clinical trial

Chi Young Shim, Darae Kim, Sungha Park, Chan Joo Lee, Hyung Ju Cho, Jong Won Ha, Yang Je Cho, Geu Ru Hong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy may decrease left ventricular (LV) loads and improve myocardial oxygenation. In this study, we investigated the effect of CPAP on LV diastolic function compared with sham treatment in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). This 3-month prospective single-centre randomised sham-controlled trial analysed 52 patients with severe OSA. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either CPAP or sham treatment for 3 months. The main investigator and patients were masked to the trial randomisation. The primary endpoint was change of early diastolic mitral annular (e) velocity over the 3-month period. Secondary end-points were pulse wave velocity (PWV), 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and variables of ventricular-vascular coupling at 3 months. After 3 months of follow-up, CPAP treatment significantly increased the e velocity, and was greater than the sham treatment (0.65±1.70 versus -0.61±1.85 cms-1, p=0.014). The PWV, 24-h mean diastolic BP, night-time diastolic BP, arterial elastance index and ventricular-vascular coupling index after 3 months of follow-up decreased significantly in the CPAP group. In patients with severe OSA, CPAP treatment for 3 months improved LV diastolic function more than sham treatment, and was accompanied by improvements in arterial stiffness and ventricular-vascular coupling.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1701774
JournalEuropean Respiratory Journal
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Feb 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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