Effects of Different-Race Exposure in School and Neighborhood on the Reading Achievement of Hmong Students in the United States

Moosung Lee, Beatrice Oi Yeung Lam, Na’im Madyun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Based on analyses of 1,622 Hmong adolescents in a large urban school district, we illuminate a positive association between school different-race exposure and Hmong limited English proficient students’ reading achievement. However, we also note a negative association of neighborhood different-race exposure with Hmong students from low socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds. These findings suggest that even if school different-race exposure opportunities are developed through racially diverse schools, this does not necessarily lead to desirable interracial social ties between Hmong students and mainstream English-speaking students. Rather, Hmong students from low SES backgrounds are more likely to benefit academically when they reside in predominantly Hmong neighborhoods.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1255-1283
Number of pages29
JournalUrban Education
Volume52
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Dec 1

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student
socioeconomic status
school
social status
speaking
effect
exposure
district
adolescent

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

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Effects of Different-Race Exposure in School and Neighborhood on the Reading Achievement of Hmong Students in the United States. / Lee, Moosung; Lam, Beatrice Oi Yeung; Madyun, Na’im.

In: Urban Education, Vol. 52, No. 10, 01.12.2017, p. 1255-1283.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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