Effects of double skin envelopes on natural ventilation and heating loads in office buildings

Yu Min Kim, Ji Hyun Lee, Sang Min Kim, Sooyoung Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The influence of natural ventilation on heating load and energy savings in a building with a double skinned envelope (DSE) was examined in this study. Field measurements and computer simulations were performed under various weather conditions. The DSE was effective for saving energy and creating natural ventilation rates under clear and partly cloudy skies. Due to insufficient irradiance, the DSE was not effective for reducing the heating load under overcast sky conditions. When natural airflow rates from the cavity space between internal and external skin to the indoor space were controlled, the southwest-facing DSE effectively reduced heating loads due to the accumulation of solar irradiance. Regression models showed that outdoor air temperature was the most significant factor governing variations in cavity temperature under all sky conditions. Computer simulations indicated that natural ventilation was practical at an appropriate supply temperature only when the sky ratio was less than 0.7. The airspace in cavity of the DSE provided additional natural ventilation rates to the indoor space and effectively reduced heating loads. Natural ventilation was available for 135 h during three winter months without consuming additional energy to heat the outdoor air. The heating load was reduced by the DSE ranged from 17.98% to 18.7% depending on the airflow control options for the cavity space.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2118-2126
Number of pages9
JournalEnergy and Buildings
Volume43
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Sep

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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