Effects of gratitude meditation on neural network functional connectivity and brain-heart coupling

Sunghyon Kyeong, Joohan Kim, Dae Jin Kim, Hesun Erin Kim, Jae-Jin Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A sense of gratitude is a powerful and positive experience that can promote a happier life, whereas resentment is associated with life dissatisfaction. To explore the effects of gratitude and resentment on mental well-being, we acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging and heart rate (HR) data before, during, and after the gratitude and resentment interventions. Functional connectivity (FC) analysis was conducted to identify the modulatory effects of gratitude on the default mode, emotion, and reward-motivation networks. The average HR was significantly lower during the gratitude intervention than during the resentment intervention. Temporostriatal FC showed a positive correlation with HR during the gratitude intervention, but not during the resentment intervention. Temporostriatal resting-state FC was significantly decreased after the gratitude intervention compared to the resentment intervention. After the gratitude intervention, resting-state FC of the amygdala with the right dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex were positively correlated with anxiety scale and depression scale, respectively. Taken together, our findings shed light on the effect of gratitude meditation on an individual's mental well-being, and indicate that it may be a means of improving both emotion regulation and self-motivation by modulating resting-state FC in emotion and motivation-related brain regions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5058
JournalScientific reports
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Dec 1

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Meditation
Motivation
Emotions
Heart Rate
Brain
Gyrus Cinguli
Amygdala
Prefrontal Cortex
Reward
Anxiety
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Depression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

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Effects of gratitude meditation on neural network functional connectivity and brain-heart coupling. / Kyeong, Sunghyon; Kim, Joohan; Kim, Dae Jin; Kim, Hesun Erin; Kim, Jae-Jin.

In: Scientific reports, Vol. 7, No. 1, 5058, 01.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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