Effects of in utero and Postnatal Exposure to Secondhand Smoke on Lung Function by Gender and Asthma Status: The Seven Northeastern Cities (SNEC) Study

Li Wen Hu, Mo Yang, Shu Chen, Kuntal Shah, Yismaw Hailegiorgis, Richai Burgens, Michael Vaughn, Jin Huang, Pamela Xaverius, Gunther Paul, Lidia Morawska, Tao Lu, Shao Lin, Shou Qiang Zhong, Min Li Kong, Yan Qi Xie, Yuan Tao Hao, Xiao Wen Zeng, Zhengmin Qian, Guang Hui Dong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Little information exists on whether gender or asthma status modifies the effects of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure on lung function. Objective: To evaluate whether gender or asthma status modifies the association of SHS exposure with lung function. Methods: A total of 6,740 children (average 11.6 years) were recruited from 24 districts of 7 cities in northeast China in 2012. SHS exposure included exposure to environmental and maternal smoking both in utero and during early childhood (postnatal). Lung function was measured using electronic spirometers. Two-step regressions were used to analyze the association between SHS and lung function. Results: In utero and postnatal exposure to SHS was independently associated with decreased lung function in both genders; however, this association was greater among males. For example, when exposed to maternal smoking during pregnancy, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for decreased forced vital capacity (FVC) was 6.46 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.58-16.17) among males, while only 2.16 (95% CI: 0.96-4.88) among females. More positive associations between SHS exposure and decreased lung function were detected among nonasthmatic compared with asthmatic children. Nonasthmatics had significantly larger deficits from in utero exposure to maternal smoking, which concerned decreased lung FVC function (aOR = 2.58, 95% CI: 1.28-5.21) and decreased lung forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) function (aOR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.01-5.33). A similar pattern was also observed for the associations between SHS exposure and continuous pulmonary function test measurements. Conclusions: SHS exposure was associated with decreased lung function. Males and nonasthmatics seem to be more susceptible than their respective counterparts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-197
Number of pages9
JournalRespiration
Volume93
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Feb 1

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Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Asthma
Lung
Confidence Intervals
Maternal Exposure
Smoking
Odds Ratio
Vital Capacity
Respiratory Function Tests
Environmental Exposure
Forced Expiratory Volume
China
Mothers
Pregnancy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Hu, Li Wen ; Yang, Mo ; Chen, Shu ; Shah, Kuntal ; Hailegiorgis, Yismaw ; Burgens, Richai ; Vaughn, Michael ; Huang, Jin ; Xaverius, Pamela ; Paul, Gunther ; Morawska, Lidia ; Lu, Tao ; Lin, Shao ; Zhong, Shou Qiang ; Kong, Min Li ; Xie, Yan Qi ; Hao, Yuan Tao ; Zeng, Xiao Wen ; Qian, Zhengmin ; Dong, Guang Hui. / Effects of in utero and Postnatal Exposure to Secondhand Smoke on Lung Function by Gender and Asthma Status : The Seven Northeastern Cities (SNEC) Study. In: Respiration. 2017 ; Vol. 93, No. 3. pp. 189-197.
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title = "Effects of in utero and Postnatal Exposure to Secondhand Smoke on Lung Function by Gender and Asthma Status: The Seven Northeastern Cities (SNEC) Study",
abstract = "Background: Little information exists on whether gender or asthma status modifies the effects of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure on lung function. Objective: To evaluate whether gender or asthma status modifies the association of SHS exposure with lung function. Methods: A total of 6,740 children (average 11.6 years) were recruited from 24 districts of 7 cities in northeast China in 2012. SHS exposure included exposure to environmental and maternal smoking both in utero and during early childhood (postnatal). Lung function was measured using electronic spirometers. Two-step regressions were used to analyze the association between SHS and lung function. Results: In utero and postnatal exposure to SHS was independently associated with decreased lung function in both genders; however, this association was greater among males. For example, when exposed to maternal smoking during pregnancy, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for decreased forced vital capacity (FVC) was 6.46 (95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 2.58-16.17) among males, while only 2.16 (95{\%} CI: 0.96-4.88) among females. More positive associations between SHS exposure and decreased lung function were detected among nonasthmatic compared with asthmatic children. Nonasthmatics had significantly larger deficits from in utero exposure to maternal smoking, which concerned decreased lung FVC function (aOR = 2.58, 95{\%} CI: 1.28-5.21) and decreased lung forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) function (aOR = 2.32, 95{\%} CI: 1.01-5.33). A similar pattern was also observed for the associations between SHS exposure and continuous pulmonary function test measurements. Conclusions: SHS exposure was associated with decreased lung function. Males and nonasthmatics seem to be more susceptible than their respective counterparts.",
author = "Hu, {Li Wen} and Mo Yang and Shu Chen and Kuntal Shah and Yismaw Hailegiorgis and Richai Burgens and Michael Vaughn and Jin Huang and Pamela Xaverius and Gunther Paul and Lidia Morawska and Tao Lu and Shao Lin and Zhong, {Shou Qiang} and Kong, {Min Li} and Xie, {Yan Qi} and Hao, {Yuan Tao} and Zeng, {Xiao Wen} and Zhengmin Qian and Dong, {Guang Hui}",
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Hu, LW, Yang, M, Chen, S, Shah, K, Hailegiorgis, Y, Burgens, R, Vaughn, M, Huang, J, Xaverius, P, Paul, G, Morawska, L, Lu, T, Lin, S, Zhong, SQ, Kong, ML, Xie, YQ, Hao, YT, Zeng, XW, Qian, Z & Dong, GH 2017, 'Effects of in utero and Postnatal Exposure to Secondhand Smoke on Lung Function by Gender and Asthma Status: The Seven Northeastern Cities (SNEC) Study', Respiration, vol. 93, no. 3, pp. 189-197. https://doi.org/10.1159/000455140

Effects of in utero and Postnatal Exposure to Secondhand Smoke on Lung Function by Gender and Asthma Status : The Seven Northeastern Cities (SNEC) Study. / Hu, Li Wen; Yang, Mo; Chen, Shu; Shah, Kuntal; Hailegiorgis, Yismaw; Burgens, Richai; Vaughn, Michael; Huang, Jin; Xaverius, Pamela; Paul, Gunther; Morawska, Lidia; Lu, Tao; Lin, Shao; Zhong, Shou Qiang; Kong, Min Li; Xie, Yan Qi; Hao, Yuan Tao; Zeng, Xiao Wen; Qian, Zhengmin; Dong, Guang Hui.

In: Respiration, Vol. 93, No. 3, 01.02.2017, p. 189-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of in utero and Postnatal Exposure to Secondhand Smoke on Lung Function by Gender and Asthma Status

T2 - The Seven Northeastern Cities (SNEC) Study

AU - Hu, Li Wen

AU - Yang, Mo

AU - Chen, Shu

AU - Shah, Kuntal

AU - Hailegiorgis, Yismaw

AU - Burgens, Richai

AU - Vaughn, Michael

AU - Huang, Jin

AU - Xaverius, Pamela

AU - Paul, Gunther

AU - Morawska, Lidia

AU - Lu, Tao

AU - Lin, Shao

AU - Zhong, Shou Qiang

AU - Kong, Min Li

AU - Xie, Yan Qi

AU - Hao, Yuan Tao

AU - Zeng, Xiao Wen

AU - Qian, Zhengmin

AU - Dong, Guang Hui

PY - 2017/2/1

Y1 - 2017/2/1

N2 - Background: Little information exists on whether gender or asthma status modifies the effects of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure on lung function. Objective: To evaluate whether gender or asthma status modifies the association of SHS exposure with lung function. Methods: A total of 6,740 children (average 11.6 years) were recruited from 24 districts of 7 cities in northeast China in 2012. SHS exposure included exposure to environmental and maternal smoking both in utero and during early childhood (postnatal). Lung function was measured using electronic spirometers. Two-step regressions were used to analyze the association between SHS and lung function. Results: In utero and postnatal exposure to SHS was independently associated with decreased lung function in both genders; however, this association was greater among males. For example, when exposed to maternal smoking during pregnancy, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for decreased forced vital capacity (FVC) was 6.46 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.58-16.17) among males, while only 2.16 (95% CI: 0.96-4.88) among females. More positive associations between SHS exposure and decreased lung function were detected among nonasthmatic compared with asthmatic children. Nonasthmatics had significantly larger deficits from in utero exposure to maternal smoking, which concerned decreased lung FVC function (aOR = 2.58, 95% CI: 1.28-5.21) and decreased lung forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) function (aOR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.01-5.33). A similar pattern was also observed for the associations between SHS exposure and continuous pulmonary function test measurements. Conclusions: SHS exposure was associated with decreased lung function. Males and nonasthmatics seem to be more susceptible than their respective counterparts.

AB - Background: Little information exists on whether gender or asthma status modifies the effects of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure on lung function. Objective: To evaluate whether gender or asthma status modifies the association of SHS exposure with lung function. Methods: A total of 6,740 children (average 11.6 years) were recruited from 24 districts of 7 cities in northeast China in 2012. SHS exposure included exposure to environmental and maternal smoking both in utero and during early childhood (postnatal). Lung function was measured using electronic spirometers. Two-step regressions were used to analyze the association between SHS and lung function. Results: In utero and postnatal exposure to SHS was independently associated with decreased lung function in both genders; however, this association was greater among males. For example, when exposed to maternal smoking during pregnancy, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for decreased forced vital capacity (FVC) was 6.46 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.58-16.17) among males, while only 2.16 (95% CI: 0.96-4.88) among females. More positive associations between SHS exposure and decreased lung function were detected among nonasthmatic compared with asthmatic children. Nonasthmatics had significantly larger deficits from in utero exposure to maternal smoking, which concerned decreased lung FVC function (aOR = 2.58, 95% CI: 1.28-5.21) and decreased lung forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) function (aOR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.01-5.33). A similar pattern was also observed for the associations between SHS exposure and continuous pulmonary function test measurements. Conclusions: SHS exposure was associated with decreased lung function. Males and nonasthmatics seem to be more susceptible than their respective counterparts.

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