Effects of laparoscopic versus open surgery on splenic vessel patency after spleen and splenic vessel-preserving distal pancreatectomy: a retrospective multicenter study

Yoo Seok Yoon, Kyoung Ho Lee, Ho Seong Han, Jai Young Cho, Jin Young Jang, Sun Whe Kim, Woo Jung Lee, Chang Moo Kang, Sang Jae Park, Sung Sik Han, Young Joon Ahn, Hee Chul Yu, In Seok Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The aims of this study were to compare splenic vessel patency between laparoscopic and open spleen and splenic vessel-preserving distal pancreatectomy (SSVpDP), and to identify possible risk factors for poor splenic vessel patency. Methods: This retrospective multicenter study included 116 patients who underwent laparoscopic (n = 70) or open (n = 46) SSVpDP at seven Korean tertiary medical institutions between 2004 and 2011. Clinical parameters and the splenic vessel patency assessed by abdominal computed tomography were compared between the two surgical procedures. Results: The clinical parameters were not significantly different between both groups, except for postoperative hospital stay, which was significantly shorter in the laparoscopic group (10.4 vs. 13.5 days, P = 0.024). The splenic artery patency rate was similar in both groups (90.0 vs. 97.8 %), but the splenic vein patency rate was significantly lower in the laparoscopic group (64.3 vs. 87.0 %, P = 0.022). Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed surgical procedure [odds ratio (OR) 3.085, P = 0.043] and intraoperative blood loss (OR 4.624, P = 0.002) as independent risk factors for compromised splenic vein patency (partial or total occlusion). The splenic vein patency rate was significantly better in the late group (n = 34) than in the early period (n = 35) (79.4 vs. 48.6 %, P = 0.008). Conclusions: Although laparoscopic SSVpDP had an advantage of shorter hospital stay compared with open surgery, it was associated with greater risk of poor splenic vein patency. However, this risk could decrease with increasing surgical experience and with efforts to minimize blood loss.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)583-588
Number of pages6
JournalSurgical endoscopy
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Splenic Vein
Pancreatectomy
Multicenter Studies
Spleen
Retrospective Studies
Length of Stay
Odds Ratio
Splenic Artery
Multivariate Analysis
Tomography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Yoon, Yoo Seok ; Lee, Kyoung Ho ; Han, Ho Seong ; Cho, Jai Young ; Jang, Jin Young ; Kim, Sun Whe ; Lee, Woo Jung ; Kang, Chang Moo ; Park, Sang Jae ; Han, Sung Sik ; Ahn, Young Joon ; Yu, Hee Chul ; Choi, In Seok. / Effects of laparoscopic versus open surgery on splenic vessel patency after spleen and splenic vessel-preserving distal pancreatectomy : a retrospective multicenter study. In: Surgical endoscopy. 2015 ; Vol. 29, No. 3. pp. 583-588.
@article{b09a5a95d7a041289432c253e986bd37,
title = "Effects of laparoscopic versus open surgery on splenic vessel patency after spleen and splenic vessel-preserving distal pancreatectomy: a retrospective multicenter study",
abstract = "Background: The aims of this study were to compare splenic vessel patency between laparoscopic and open spleen and splenic vessel-preserving distal pancreatectomy (SSVpDP), and to identify possible risk factors for poor splenic vessel patency. Methods: This retrospective multicenter study included 116 patients who underwent laparoscopic (n = 70) or open (n = 46) SSVpDP at seven Korean tertiary medical institutions between 2004 and 2011. Clinical parameters and the splenic vessel patency assessed by abdominal computed tomography were compared between the two surgical procedures. Results: The clinical parameters were not significantly different between both groups, except for postoperative hospital stay, which was significantly shorter in the laparoscopic group (10.4 vs. 13.5 days, P = 0.024). The splenic artery patency rate was similar in both groups (90.0 vs. 97.8 {\%}), but the splenic vein patency rate was significantly lower in the laparoscopic group (64.3 vs. 87.0 {\%}, P = 0.022). Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed surgical procedure [odds ratio (OR) 3.085, P = 0.043] and intraoperative blood loss (OR 4.624, P = 0.002) as independent risk factors for compromised splenic vein patency (partial or total occlusion). The splenic vein patency rate was significantly better in the late group (n = 34) than in the early period (n = 35) (79.4 vs. 48.6 {\%}, P = 0.008). Conclusions: Although laparoscopic SSVpDP had an advantage of shorter hospital stay compared with open surgery, it was associated with greater risk of poor splenic vein patency. However, this risk could decrease with increasing surgical experience and with efforts to minimize blood loss.",
author = "Yoon, {Yoo Seok} and Lee, {Kyoung Ho} and Han, {Ho Seong} and Cho, {Jai Young} and Jang, {Jin Young} and Kim, {Sun Whe} and Lee, {Woo Jung} and Kang, {Chang Moo} and Park, {Sang Jae} and Han, {Sung Sik} and Ahn, {Young Joon} and Yu, {Hee Chul} and Choi, {In Seok}",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00464-014-3701-9",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "583--588",
journal = "Surgical Endoscopy",
issn = "0930-2794",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "3",

}

Effects of laparoscopic versus open surgery on splenic vessel patency after spleen and splenic vessel-preserving distal pancreatectomy : a retrospective multicenter study. / Yoon, Yoo Seok; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Han, Ho Seong; Cho, Jai Young; Jang, Jin Young; Kim, Sun Whe; Lee, Woo Jung; Kang, Chang Moo; Park, Sang Jae; Han, Sung Sik; Ahn, Young Joon; Yu, Hee Chul; Choi, In Seok.

In: Surgical endoscopy, Vol. 29, No. 3, 01.01.2015, p. 583-588.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of laparoscopic versus open surgery on splenic vessel patency after spleen and splenic vessel-preserving distal pancreatectomy

T2 - a retrospective multicenter study

AU - Yoon, Yoo Seok

AU - Lee, Kyoung Ho

AU - Han, Ho Seong

AU - Cho, Jai Young

AU - Jang, Jin Young

AU - Kim, Sun Whe

AU - Lee, Woo Jung

AU - Kang, Chang Moo

AU - Park, Sang Jae

AU - Han, Sung Sik

AU - Ahn, Young Joon

AU - Yu, Hee Chul

AU - Choi, In Seok

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Background: The aims of this study were to compare splenic vessel patency between laparoscopic and open spleen and splenic vessel-preserving distal pancreatectomy (SSVpDP), and to identify possible risk factors for poor splenic vessel patency. Methods: This retrospective multicenter study included 116 patients who underwent laparoscopic (n = 70) or open (n = 46) SSVpDP at seven Korean tertiary medical institutions between 2004 and 2011. Clinical parameters and the splenic vessel patency assessed by abdominal computed tomography were compared between the two surgical procedures. Results: The clinical parameters were not significantly different between both groups, except for postoperative hospital stay, which was significantly shorter in the laparoscopic group (10.4 vs. 13.5 days, P = 0.024). The splenic artery patency rate was similar in both groups (90.0 vs. 97.8 %), but the splenic vein patency rate was significantly lower in the laparoscopic group (64.3 vs. 87.0 %, P = 0.022). Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed surgical procedure [odds ratio (OR) 3.085, P = 0.043] and intraoperative blood loss (OR 4.624, P = 0.002) as independent risk factors for compromised splenic vein patency (partial or total occlusion). The splenic vein patency rate was significantly better in the late group (n = 34) than in the early period (n = 35) (79.4 vs. 48.6 %, P = 0.008). Conclusions: Although laparoscopic SSVpDP had an advantage of shorter hospital stay compared with open surgery, it was associated with greater risk of poor splenic vein patency. However, this risk could decrease with increasing surgical experience and with efforts to minimize blood loss.

AB - Background: The aims of this study were to compare splenic vessel patency between laparoscopic and open spleen and splenic vessel-preserving distal pancreatectomy (SSVpDP), and to identify possible risk factors for poor splenic vessel patency. Methods: This retrospective multicenter study included 116 patients who underwent laparoscopic (n = 70) or open (n = 46) SSVpDP at seven Korean tertiary medical institutions between 2004 and 2011. Clinical parameters and the splenic vessel patency assessed by abdominal computed tomography were compared between the two surgical procedures. Results: The clinical parameters were not significantly different between both groups, except for postoperative hospital stay, which was significantly shorter in the laparoscopic group (10.4 vs. 13.5 days, P = 0.024). The splenic artery patency rate was similar in both groups (90.0 vs. 97.8 %), but the splenic vein patency rate was significantly lower in the laparoscopic group (64.3 vs. 87.0 %, P = 0.022). Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed surgical procedure [odds ratio (OR) 3.085, P = 0.043] and intraoperative blood loss (OR 4.624, P = 0.002) as independent risk factors for compromised splenic vein patency (partial or total occlusion). The splenic vein patency rate was significantly better in the late group (n = 34) than in the early period (n = 35) (79.4 vs. 48.6 %, P = 0.008). Conclusions: Although laparoscopic SSVpDP had an advantage of shorter hospital stay compared with open surgery, it was associated with greater risk of poor splenic vein patency. However, this risk could decrease with increasing surgical experience and with efforts to minimize blood loss.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84939892198&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84939892198&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00464-014-3701-9

DO - 10.1007/s00464-014-3701-9

M3 - Article

C2 - 25005018

AN - SCOPUS:84939892198

VL - 29

SP - 583

EP - 588

JO - Surgical Endoscopy

JF - Surgical Endoscopy

SN - 0930-2794

IS - 3

ER -