Electrophysiologic disturbances during daytime in patients with restless legs syndrome: Further evidence of cognitive dysfunction?

Ki Young Jung, Yong Seo Koo, Byung Jo Kim, Deokwon Ko, Gwan Taek Lee, Kyunghwan Kim, Chang Hwan Im

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Backgrounds: It has been reported that patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) may have cognitive deficit. The authors performed EEG and ERP analysis during daytime to identify electrophysiologic relations with cognitive dysfunction in unmedicated RLS patients. Methods: Seventeen drug naive RLS patients (53.7 ± 9.6 years) and 13 age-matched healthy controls participated in the present study. EEG was recorded during the waking-resting state and during a visual oddball task. RLS severities were determined using the International RLS Severity Scale. Stanford sleepiness scale (SSS) and bothersomeness visual analog scale (VAS) scores were determined immediately after ERP sessions. EEG power spectra and P300 amplitude and latency were compared for patients and controls. Clinical variables were correlated with P300 findings. Results: Waking-resting EEG showed that RLS patients had significantly higher beta activity in frontocentral regions than controls. SSS scores were not different in the two groups. But the bothersomeness VAS scores of RLS patients were significantly higher than those of controls. Furthermore, P300 latency was significantly longer in patients, and patients had significantly lower P300 amplitudes in frontal and central locations. In addition, P300 latency was found to be significantly correlated with bothersomeness during the ERP test, whereas P300 amplitude showed no such tendency. Conclusions: Our study supports the notion that RLS patients have an underlying cognitive dysfunction. Significant correlations found between P300 latency and bothersomeness, a lack of sleepiness during the ERP test, and increased beta activity in resting state EEGs suggest that a combination of inattention and cortical dysfunction underlie cognitive dysfunction in RLS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)416-421
Number of pages6
JournalSleep Medicine
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Apr 1

Fingerprint

Restless Legs Syndrome
Electroencephalography
Visual Analog Scale
Cognitive Dysfunction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Jung, Ki Young ; Koo, Yong Seo ; Kim, Byung Jo ; Ko, Deokwon ; Lee, Gwan Taek ; Kim, Kyunghwan ; Im, Chang Hwan. / Electrophysiologic disturbances during daytime in patients with restless legs syndrome : Further evidence of cognitive dysfunction?. In: Sleep Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 12, No. 4. pp. 416-421.
@article{8b2f4e01f0194f6fa6de3c8baec5575c,
title = "Electrophysiologic disturbances during daytime in patients with restless legs syndrome: Further evidence of cognitive dysfunction?",
abstract = "Backgrounds: It has been reported that patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) may have cognitive deficit. The authors performed EEG and ERP analysis during daytime to identify electrophysiologic relations with cognitive dysfunction in unmedicated RLS patients. Methods: Seventeen drug naive RLS patients (53.7 ± 9.6 years) and 13 age-matched healthy controls participated in the present study. EEG was recorded during the waking-resting state and during a visual oddball task. RLS severities were determined using the International RLS Severity Scale. Stanford sleepiness scale (SSS) and bothersomeness visual analog scale (VAS) scores were determined immediately after ERP sessions. EEG power spectra and P300 amplitude and latency were compared for patients and controls. Clinical variables were correlated with P300 findings. Results: Waking-resting EEG showed that RLS patients had significantly higher beta activity in frontocentral regions than controls. SSS scores were not different in the two groups. But the bothersomeness VAS scores of RLS patients were significantly higher than those of controls. Furthermore, P300 latency was significantly longer in patients, and patients had significantly lower P300 amplitudes in frontal and central locations. In addition, P300 latency was found to be significantly correlated with bothersomeness during the ERP test, whereas P300 amplitude showed no such tendency. Conclusions: Our study supports the notion that RLS patients have an underlying cognitive dysfunction. Significant correlations found between P300 latency and bothersomeness, a lack of sleepiness during the ERP test, and increased beta activity in resting state EEGs suggest that a combination of inattention and cortical dysfunction underlie cognitive dysfunction in RLS.",
author = "Jung, {Ki Young} and Koo, {Yong Seo} and Kim, {Byung Jo} and Deokwon Ko and Lee, {Gwan Taek} and Kyunghwan Kim and Im, {Chang Hwan}",
year = "2011",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.sleep.2010.08.018",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "416--421",
journal = "Sleep Medicine",
issn = "1389-9457",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "4",

}

Electrophysiologic disturbances during daytime in patients with restless legs syndrome : Further evidence of cognitive dysfunction? / Jung, Ki Young; Koo, Yong Seo; Kim, Byung Jo; Ko, Deokwon; Lee, Gwan Taek; Kim, Kyunghwan; Im, Chang Hwan.

In: Sleep Medicine, Vol. 12, No. 4, 01.04.2011, p. 416-421.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Electrophysiologic disturbances during daytime in patients with restless legs syndrome

T2 - Further evidence of cognitive dysfunction?

AU - Jung, Ki Young

AU - Koo, Yong Seo

AU - Kim, Byung Jo

AU - Ko, Deokwon

AU - Lee, Gwan Taek

AU - Kim, Kyunghwan

AU - Im, Chang Hwan

PY - 2011/4/1

Y1 - 2011/4/1

N2 - Backgrounds: It has been reported that patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) may have cognitive deficit. The authors performed EEG and ERP analysis during daytime to identify electrophysiologic relations with cognitive dysfunction in unmedicated RLS patients. Methods: Seventeen drug naive RLS patients (53.7 ± 9.6 years) and 13 age-matched healthy controls participated in the present study. EEG was recorded during the waking-resting state and during a visual oddball task. RLS severities were determined using the International RLS Severity Scale. Stanford sleepiness scale (SSS) and bothersomeness visual analog scale (VAS) scores were determined immediately after ERP sessions. EEG power spectra and P300 amplitude and latency were compared for patients and controls. Clinical variables were correlated with P300 findings. Results: Waking-resting EEG showed that RLS patients had significantly higher beta activity in frontocentral regions than controls. SSS scores were not different in the two groups. But the bothersomeness VAS scores of RLS patients were significantly higher than those of controls. Furthermore, P300 latency was significantly longer in patients, and patients had significantly lower P300 amplitudes in frontal and central locations. In addition, P300 latency was found to be significantly correlated with bothersomeness during the ERP test, whereas P300 amplitude showed no such tendency. Conclusions: Our study supports the notion that RLS patients have an underlying cognitive dysfunction. Significant correlations found between P300 latency and bothersomeness, a lack of sleepiness during the ERP test, and increased beta activity in resting state EEGs suggest that a combination of inattention and cortical dysfunction underlie cognitive dysfunction in RLS.

AB - Backgrounds: It has been reported that patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) may have cognitive deficit. The authors performed EEG and ERP analysis during daytime to identify electrophysiologic relations with cognitive dysfunction in unmedicated RLS patients. Methods: Seventeen drug naive RLS patients (53.7 ± 9.6 years) and 13 age-matched healthy controls participated in the present study. EEG was recorded during the waking-resting state and during a visual oddball task. RLS severities were determined using the International RLS Severity Scale. Stanford sleepiness scale (SSS) and bothersomeness visual analog scale (VAS) scores were determined immediately after ERP sessions. EEG power spectra and P300 amplitude and latency were compared for patients and controls. Clinical variables were correlated with P300 findings. Results: Waking-resting EEG showed that RLS patients had significantly higher beta activity in frontocentral regions than controls. SSS scores were not different in the two groups. But the bothersomeness VAS scores of RLS patients were significantly higher than those of controls. Furthermore, P300 latency was significantly longer in patients, and patients had significantly lower P300 amplitudes in frontal and central locations. In addition, P300 latency was found to be significantly correlated with bothersomeness during the ERP test, whereas P300 amplitude showed no such tendency. Conclusions: Our study supports the notion that RLS patients have an underlying cognitive dysfunction. Significant correlations found between P300 latency and bothersomeness, a lack of sleepiness during the ERP test, and increased beta activity in resting state EEGs suggest that a combination of inattention and cortical dysfunction underlie cognitive dysfunction in RLS.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79953051714&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79953051714&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.sleep.2010.08.018

DO - 10.1016/j.sleep.2010.08.018

M3 - Article

C2 - 21377421

AN - SCOPUS:79953051714

VL - 12

SP - 416

EP - 421

JO - Sleep Medicine

JF - Sleep Medicine

SN - 1389-9457

IS - 4

ER -