Elevated Prevalence of Suicide Attempts among Victims of Police Violence in the USA

Jordan E. DeVylder, Jodi J. Frey, Courtney D. Cogburn, Holly C. Wilcox, Tanya L. Sharpe, Hans Y. Oh, Boyoung Nam, Bruce G. Link

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent evidence suggests that police victimization is widespread in the USA and psychologically impactful. We hypothesized that civilian-reported police victimization, particularly assaultive victimization (i.e., physical/sexual), would be associated with a greater prevalence of suicide attempts and suicidal ideation. Data were drawn from the Survey of Police-Public Encounters, a population-based survey of adults (N = 1615) residing in four US cities. Surveys assessed lifetime exposure to police victimization based on the World Health Organization domains of violence (i.e., physical, sexual, psychological, and neglect), using the Police Practices Inventory. Logistic regression models tested for associations between police victimization and (1) past 12-month suicide attempts and (2) past 12-month suicidal ideation, adjusted for demographic factors (i.e., gender, sexual orientation, race/ethnicity, income), crime involvement, past intimate partner and sexual victimization exposure, and lifetime mental illness. Police victimization was associated with suicide attempts but not suicidal ideation in adjusted analyses. Specifically, odds of attempts were greatly increased for respondents reporting assaultive forms of victimization, including physical victimization (odds ratio = 4.5), physical victimization with a weapon (odds ratio = 10.7), and sexual victimization (odds ratio = 10.2). Assessing for police victimization and other violence exposures may be a useful component of suicide risk screening in urban US settings. Further, community-based efforts should be made to reduce the prevalence of exposure to police victimization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)629-636
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Urban Health
Volume94
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Oct 1

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suicide
suicide attempt
Crime Victims
Police
violence
Violence
victimization
Suicide
police
Suicidal Ideation
Odds Ratio
weapon
World Health Organization
crime
Logistic Models
ethnicity
logistics
Weapons
gender
Sexual Partners

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Urban Studies
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

DeVylder, J. E., Frey, J. J., Cogburn, C. D., Wilcox, H. C., Sharpe, T. L., Oh, H. Y., ... Link, B. G. (2017). Elevated Prevalence of Suicide Attempts among Victims of Police Violence in the USA. Journal of Urban Health, 94(5), 629-636. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11524-017-0160-3
DeVylder, Jordan E. ; Frey, Jodi J. ; Cogburn, Courtney D. ; Wilcox, Holly C. ; Sharpe, Tanya L. ; Oh, Hans Y. ; Nam, Boyoung ; Link, Bruce G. / Elevated Prevalence of Suicide Attempts among Victims of Police Violence in the USA. In: Journal of Urban Health. 2017 ; Vol. 94, No. 5. pp. 629-636.
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DeVylder, JE, Frey, JJ, Cogburn, CD, Wilcox, HC, Sharpe, TL, Oh, HY, Nam, B & Link, BG 2017, 'Elevated Prevalence of Suicide Attempts among Victims of Police Violence in the USA', Journal of Urban Health, vol. 94, no. 5, pp. 629-636. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11524-017-0160-3

Elevated Prevalence of Suicide Attempts among Victims of Police Violence in the USA. / DeVylder, Jordan E.; Frey, Jodi J.; Cogburn, Courtney D.; Wilcox, Holly C.; Sharpe, Tanya L.; Oh, Hans Y.; Nam, Boyoung; Link, Bruce G.

In: Journal of Urban Health, Vol. 94, No. 5, 01.10.2017, p. 629-636.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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DeVylder JE, Frey JJ, Cogburn CD, Wilcox HC, Sharpe TL, Oh HY et al. Elevated Prevalence of Suicide Attempts among Victims of Police Violence in the USA. Journal of Urban Health. 2017 Oct 1;94(5):629-636. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11524-017-0160-3