Enhancing the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs using supercritical antisolvent (SAS) process

Sharif Md Abuzar, Sang Min Hyun, Jun Hee Kim, Hee Jun Park, Min Soo Kim, Jeong Sook Park, Sung Joo Hwang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Poor water solubility and poor bioavailability are problems with many pharmaceuticals. Increasing surface area by micronization is an effective strategy to overcome these problems, but conventional techniques often utilize solvents and harsh processing, which restricts their use. Newer, green technologies, such as supercritical fluid (SCF)-assisted particle formation, can produce solvent-free products under relatively mild conditions, offering many advantages over conventional methods. The antisolvent properties of the SCFs used for microparticle and nanoparticle formation have generated great interest in recent years, because the kinetics of the precipitation process and morphologies of the particles can be accurately controlled. The characteristics of the supercritical antisolvent (SAS) technique make it an ideal tool for enhancing the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. This review article focuses on SCFs and their properties, as well as the fundamentals of overcoming poorly water-soluble drug properties by micronization, crystal morphology control, and formation of composite solid dispersion nanoparticles with polymers and/or surfactants. This article also presents an overview of the main aspects of the SAS-assisted particle precipitation process, its mechanism, and parameters, as well as our own experiences, recent advances, and trends in development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Pharmaceutics
Volume538
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Mar 1

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Solubility
Biological Availability
Nanoparticles
Water
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Surface-Active Agents
Polymers
Technology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Abuzar, Sharif Md ; Hyun, Sang Min ; Kim, Jun Hee ; Park, Hee Jun ; Kim, Min Soo ; Park, Jeong Sook ; Hwang, Sung Joo. / Enhancing the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs using supercritical antisolvent (SAS) process. In: International Journal of Pharmaceutics. 2018 ; Vol. 538, No. 1-2. pp. 1-13.
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Enhancing the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs using supercritical antisolvent (SAS) process. / Abuzar, Sharif Md; Hyun, Sang Min; Kim, Jun Hee; Park, Hee Jun; Kim, Min Soo; Park, Jeong Sook; Hwang, Sung Joo.

In: International Journal of Pharmaceutics, Vol. 538, No. 1-2, 01.03.2018, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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