Evaluating the Chinese Revised Controlling Behaviors Scale

Agnes Tiwari, Daniel Yee Tak Fong, Ko Ling Chan, Elsie Chau Wai Yan, Gloria Ling Lee Lam, Debbie Hoi Ming Tang, Nicola Graham-Kevan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study evaluated the utility of the Chinese version of the Revised Controlling Behaviors Scale (C-CBS-R) as a measure of controlling behaviors in violent Chinese intimate relationships. Using a mixed-methods approach, in-depth, individual interviews were conducted with 200 Chinese women survivors to elicit qualitative data about their personal experiences of control in intimate relationships. The use of controlling behaviors was also assessed using the C-CBS-R. Interview accounts suggested that the experiences of 91 of the women were consistent with the description of coercive control according to Dutton and Goodman’s conceptualization of coercion. Using the split-half validation procedure, a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was conducted with the first half of the sample. The area under the curve (AUC) for using the C-CBS-R to identify high control was.99, and the cutoff score of 1.145 maximized both sensitivity and specificity. Applying the cutoff score to the second half gave a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 95%. Overall, the C-CBS-R has demonstrated utility as a measure of controlling behaviors with a cutoff score for distinguishing high from low levels of control in violent Chinese intimate relationships.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)314-332
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 28

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research and/or authorship of this article: This work was supported by the General Research Fund of the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKU753510).

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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