Everyday discrimination and mood and substance use disorders: A latent profile analysis with African Americans and Caribbean Blacks

Trenette T. Clark, Christopher P. Salas-Wright, Michael George Vaughn, Keith E. Whitfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Perceived discrimination is a major source of health-related stress. The purpose of this study was to model the heterogeneity of everyday-discrimination experiences among African American and Caribbean Blacks and to identify differences in the prevalence of mood and substance use outcomes, including generalized anxiety disorder, major depressive disorder, alcohol-use disorder, and illicit drug-use disorder among the identified subgroups. Method: The study uses data from the National Survey of American Life obtained from a sample of African American and Caribbean Black respondents (. N=. 4,462) between 18 and 65 years. Results: We used latent profile analysis and multinomial regression analyses to identify and validate latent subgroups and test hypotheses, yielding 4 classes of perceived everyday discrimination: Low Discrimination, Disrespect and Condescension, General Discrimination, and Chronic Discrimination. Findings show significant differences exist between the Low Discrimination and General Discrimination classes for major depressive disorder, alcohol-use disorder, and illicit drug-use disorder. Moreover, we find significant differences exist between the Low Discrimination and Chronic Discrimination classes for the four disorders examined. Compared with the Chronic Discrimination class, members of the other classes were significantly less likely to meet criteria for generalized anxiety disorder, major depressive disorder, alcohol-use disorder, and illicit drug-use disorder. Conclusions: Findings suggest elevated levels of discrimination increase risk for mood and substance-use disorders. Importantly, results suggest the prevalence of mood and substance-use disorders is a function of the type and frequency of discrimination that individuals experience.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)119-125
Number of pages7
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume40
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

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Street Drugs
African Americans
Substance-Related Disorders
Alcohols
Major Depressive Disorder
Anxiety Disorders
Health
Regression Analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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abstract = "Background: Perceived discrimination is a major source of health-related stress. The purpose of this study was to model the heterogeneity of everyday-discrimination experiences among African American and Caribbean Blacks and to identify differences in the prevalence of mood and substance use outcomes, including generalized anxiety disorder, major depressive disorder, alcohol-use disorder, and illicit drug-use disorder among the identified subgroups. Method: The study uses data from the National Survey of American Life obtained from a sample of African American and Caribbean Black respondents (. N=. 4,462) between 18 and 65 years. Results: We used latent profile analysis and multinomial regression analyses to identify and validate latent subgroups and test hypotheses, yielding 4 classes of perceived everyday discrimination: Low Discrimination, Disrespect and Condescension, General Discrimination, and Chronic Discrimination. Findings show significant differences exist between the Low Discrimination and General Discrimination classes for major depressive disorder, alcohol-use disorder, and illicit drug-use disorder. Moreover, we find significant differences exist between the Low Discrimination and Chronic Discrimination classes for the four disorders examined. Compared with the Chronic Discrimination class, members of the other classes were significantly less likely to meet criteria for generalized anxiety disorder, major depressive disorder, alcohol-use disorder, and illicit drug-use disorder. Conclusions: Findings suggest elevated levels of discrimination increase risk for mood and substance-use disorders. Importantly, results suggest the prevalence of mood and substance-use disorders is a function of the type and frequency of discrimination that individuals experience.",
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Everyday discrimination and mood and substance use disorders : A latent profile analysis with African Americans and Caribbean Blacks. / Clark, Trenette T.; Salas-Wright, Christopher P.; Vaughn, Michael George; Whitfield, Keith E.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 40, 01.01.2015, p. 119-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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