Exaggerated Blood Pressure Response to Exercise Is Associated With Augmented Rise of Angiotensin II During Exercise

ChiYoung Shim, Jong Won Ha, Sungha Park, Eui Young Choi, Donghoon Choi, Se Joong Rim, Namsik Chung

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Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between an exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise and augmented angiotensin (Ang) II rise during exercise. Background: Although a central pressor effect of Ang II has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension, the relationship between Ang II and exaggerated BP response to exercise is unclear. Methods: Thirty-six subjects with an exaggerated BP response to exercise (18 men, age 50 ± 16 years, Group II) were compared with 36 age- and gender-matched control subjects (18 men, age 50 ± 16 years, Group I) with normal BP reactivity. The subjects who had resting BP ≥140/90 mm Hg or were treated with any antihypertensive drugs were excluded. The blood was sampled at rest and immediately after peak exercise for measurement of renin, Ang II, aldosterone, and catecholamine. Results: At rest, there were no significant differences in BP, renin, aldosterone, and catecholamine levels between the 2 groups. The renin, aldosterone, and catecholamine were increased during exercise, but there were no significant differences between the groups. However, log Ang II at rest (0.78 ± 0.32 vs. 0.98 ± 0.38, p = 0.004) and peak exercise (0.84 ± 0.35 vs. 1.17 ± 0.51, p < 0.001) and the magnitude of the increment of log Ang II with exercise (0.06 ± 0.12 vs. 0.19 ± 0.20, p = 0.003) were significantly higher in the exaggerated BP response group. Conclusions: An exaggerated BP response to exercise was associated with augmented rise of Ang II during exercise.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)287-292
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume52
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Jul 22

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Angiotensin II
Exercise
Blood Pressure
Aldosterone
Renin
Catecholamines
Antihypertensive Agents
Hypertension

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

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title = "Exaggerated Blood Pressure Response to Exercise Is Associated With Augmented Rise of Angiotensin II During Exercise",
abstract = "Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between an exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise and augmented angiotensin (Ang) II rise during exercise. Background: Although a central pressor effect of Ang II has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension, the relationship between Ang II and exaggerated BP response to exercise is unclear. Methods: Thirty-six subjects with an exaggerated BP response to exercise (18 men, age 50 ± 16 years, Group II) were compared with 36 age- and gender-matched control subjects (18 men, age 50 ± 16 years, Group I) with normal BP reactivity. The subjects who had resting BP ≥140/90 mm Hg or were treated with any antihypertensive drugs were excluded. The blood was sampled at rest and immediately after peak exercise for measurement of renin, Ang II, aldosterone, and catecholamine. Results: At rest, there were no significant differences in BP, renin, aldosterone, and catecholamine levels between the 2 groups. The renin, aldosterone, and catecholamine were increased during exercise, but there were no significant differences between the groups. However, log Ang II at rest (0.78 ± 0.32 vs. 0.98 ± 0.38, p = 0.004) and peak exercise (0.84 ± 0.35 vs. 1.17 ± 0.51, p < 0.001) and the magnitude of the increment of log Ang II with exercise (0.06 ± 0.12 vs. 0.19 ± 0.20, p = 0.003) were significantly higher in the exaggerated BP response group. Conclusions: An exaggerated BP response to exercise was associated with augmented rise of Ang II during exercise.",
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Exaggerated Blood Pressure Response to Exercise Is Associated With Augmented Rise of Angiotensin II During Exercise. / Shim, ChiYoung; Ha, Jong Won; Park, Sungha; Choi, Eui Young; Choi, Donghoon; Rim, Se Joong; Chung, Namsik.

In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 52, No. 4, 22.07.2008, p. 287-292.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Exaggerated Blood Pressure Response to Exercise Is Associated With Augmented Rise of Angiotensin II During Exercise

AU - Shim, ChiYoung

AU - Ha, Jong Won

AU - Park, Sungha

AU - Choi, Eui Young

AU - Choi, Donghoon

AU - Rim, Se Joong

AU - Chung, Namsik

PY - 2008/7/22

Y1 - 2008/7/22

N2 - Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between an exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise and augmented angiotensin (Ang) II rise during exercise. Background: Although a central pressor effect of Ang II has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension, the relationship between Ang II and exaggerated BP response to exercise is unclear. Methods: Thirty-six subjects with an exaggerated BP response to exercise (18 men, age 50 ± 16 years, Group II) were compared with 36 age- and gender-matched control subjects (18 men, age 50 ± 16 years, Group I) with normal BP reactivity. The subjects who had resting BP ≥140/90 mm Hg or were treated with any antihypertensive drugs were excluded. The blood was sampled at rest and immediately after peak exercise for measurement of renin, Ang II, aldosterone, and catecholamine. Results: At rest, there were no significant differences in BP, renin, aldosterone, and catecholamine levels between the 2 groups. The renin, aldosterone, and catecholamine were increased during exercise, but there were no significant differences between the groups. However, log Ang II at rest (0.78 ± 0.32 vs. 0.98 ± 0.38, p = 0.004) and peak exercise (0.84 ± 0.35 vs. 1.17 ± 0.51, p < 0.001) and the magnitude of the increment of log Ang II with exercise (0.06 ± 0.12 vs. 0.19 ± 0.20, p = 0.003) were significantly higher in the exaggerated BP response group. Conclusions: An exaggerated BP response to exercise was associated with augmented rise of Ang II during exercise.

AB - Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between an exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise and augmented angiotensin (Ang) II rise during exercise. Background: Although a central pressor effect of Ang II has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension, the relationship between Ang II and exaggerated BP response to exercise is unclear. Methods: Thirty-six subjects with an exaggerated BP response to exercise (18 men, age 50 ± 16 years, Group II) were compared with 36 age- and gender-matched control subjects (18 men, age 50 ± 16 years, Group I) with normal BP reactivity. The subjects who had resting BP ≥140/90 mm Hg or were treated with any antihypertensive drugs were excluded. The blood was sampled at rest and immediately after peak exercise for measurement of renin, Ang II, aldosterone, and catecholamine. Results: At rest, there were no significant differences in BP, renin, aldosterone, and catecholamine levels between the 2 groups. The renin, aldosterone, and catecholamine were increased during exercise, but there were no significant differences between the groups. However, log Ang II at rest (0.78 ± 0.32 vs. 0.98 ± 0.38, p = 0.004) and peak exercise (0.84 ± 0.35 vs. 1.17 ± 0.51, p < 0.001) and the magnitude of the increment of log Ang II with exercise (0.06 ± 0.12 vs. 0.19 ± 0.20, p = 0.003) were significantly higher in the exaggerated BP response group. Conclusions: An exaggerated BP response to exercise was associated with augmented rise of Ang II during exercise.

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