Explaining east-west differences in the likelihood of making favorable self-evaluations

The role of evaluation apprehension and directness of expression

Young-Hoon Kim, Chi Yue Chiu, Siqing Peng, Huajian Cai, William Tov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors contend that although people in both Eastern and Western cultures are motivated to make favorable self-evaluations, the actual likelihood of expressing favorable self-evaluations in a concrete situation depends on (a) the dominant self-presentation norms in the culture, (b) how salient the norm is in the immediate situation, and (c) the availability of normatively permissible means to make favorable self-evaluations. The authors tested this proposal in three studies. Study 1 showed that given the strong influence of the modesty norm in Eastern cultures, Chinese are more comfortable making favorable self-evaluations when evaluation apprehension pressure in the immediate situation is reduced. Furthermore, Studies 2 and 3 showed that Asian Americans and Chinese are more comfortable making favorable self-evaluations when they can do it indirectly by denying possession of negative traits than when they have to do it directly by claiming possession of positive traits. In contrast, among European Americans, given the relative weak influence of the modesty norm in their culture, they are equally comfortable with making favorable self-evaluations in public and private situations through affirmation of positive self-aspects and repudiation of negative self-aspects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)62-75
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Jan 1

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Diagnostic Self Evaluation
evaluation
possession
Asian Americans
self-presentation
Pressure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology

Cite this

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Explaining east-west differences in the likelihood of making favorable self-evaluations : The role of evaluation apprehension and directness of expression. / Kim, Young-Hoon; Chiu, Chi Yue; Peng, Siqing; Cai, Huajian; Tov, William.

In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Vol. 41, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 62-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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