Exploring the dimensionality of the originality subscale of the Kirton Adaption-Innovation Inventory

Subin Im, Michael Y. Hu, Rex S. Toh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Kirton Adaption-Innovation Inventory, which is a widely used measure of innovative (as opposed to adaptive) cognitive individual style, is believed to have three dimensions: Sufficiency of Originality, Efficiency, and Rule/Group Conformity. Several studies have raised concerns regarding its construct validity, specifically with respect to the Sufficiency of Originality subscale. Within this subscale, exploratory factor analysis identified two distinct subdimensions, Idea Generation and Preference for Change. In this study, we used a sample of 356 household participants (with an average age of 56 yr., average income of $39,700, and average of 15 yr. of education) from the Arkansas Household Research Panel. We then employed Bollen and Grandjean's approach based on confirmatory factor analysis to assess whether there are actually two distinct subdimensions instead of one. Our study shows that within the Sufficiency of Originality subscale, there are indeed two distinct subdimensions, Idea Generation and Preference for Change. Further analyses indicate that dropping double-loaded items identified through exploratory factor analysis significantly improves the fit statistics. Also, allowing correlated errors for the measurement items that belong to the same subdimension can also significantly improve the overall fit of the model based on chi-square statistics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)883-894
Number of pages12
JournalPsychological Reports
Volume93
Issue number3 I
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Jan 1

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

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Exploring the dimensionality of the originality subscale of the Kirton Adaption-Innovation Inventory. / Im, Subin; Hu, Michael Y.; Toh, Rex S.

In: Psychological Reports, Vol. 93, No. 3 I, 01.01.2003, p. 883-894.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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