Expression of reactive oxygen species-related proteins in metastatic breast cancer is dependent on the metastatic site

Hye Min Kim, Woo Hee Jung, Ja Seung Koo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was performed to investigate the expression of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related proteins and to analyze the implications for primary and metastatic breast cancer. We constructed a tissue microarray containing 143 metastatic breast cancers (52 lung metastases, 38 bone metastases, 37 brain metastases, and 16 liver metastases) and performed immunohistochemical staining for ROS-related proteins (catalase, GSTp, TxNIP, and MnSOD). Analysis of ROS-related protein expression in metastatic breast cancers according to the metastatic sites revealed site-specific expression patterns. The expression of tumoral catalase was lower in bone metastases (P = 0.012), and stromal GSTp expression was higher in bone and liver metastases (P < 0.001). The highest ROS activation status was observed for lung metastases, while non-activated ROS was observed for bone metastases (P = 0.001). Primary cancers were positive for stromal GSTp, but a subset of lung metastases were negative (P = 0.021). Univariate analysis revealed that shorter overall survival (OS) was associated with negative catalase expression of the tumor (P = 0.026). Furthermore, univariate analyses according to the metastatic sites revealed that shorter OS was associated with TxNIP-positive tumors (P = 0.032) and the expression of stromal catalase (P = 0.032) in brain metastases. Tumors that were negative for MnSOD expression (P < 0.001) but positive for stromal catalase expression (P = 0.022) were associated with shorter OS in patients with liver metastases. In conclusion, cancer cells and stromal tissues showed different ROS-related protein expression patterns according to the metastatic site. In addition, the expression of ROS-related proteins is associated with patient prognosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8802-8812
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Clinical and Experimental Pathology
Volume7
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

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Reactive Oxygen Species
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasm Metastasis
Catalase
Proteins
Bone and Bones
Neoplasms
Survival
Liver
Lung
Brain
Stromal Cells
Lung Neoplasms
Staining and Labeling

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Histology

Cite this

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title = "Expression of reactive oxygen species-related proteins in metastatic breast cancer is dependent on the metastatic site",
abstract = "This study was performed to investigate the expression of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related proteins and to analyze the implications for primary and metastatic breast cancer. We constructed a tissue microarray containing 143 metastatic breast cancers (52 lung metastases, 38 bone metastases, 37 brain metastases, and 16 liver metastases) and performed immunohistochemical staining for ROS-related proteins (catalase, GSTp, TxNIP, and MnSOD). Analysis of ROS-related protein expression in metastatic breast cancers according to the metastatic sites revealed site-specific expression patterns. The expression of tumoral catalase was lower in bone metastases (P = 0.012), and stromal GSTp expression was higher in bone and liver metastases (P < 0.001). The highest ROS activation status was observed for lung metastases, while non-activated ROS was observed for bone metastases (P = 0.001). Primary cancers were positive for stromal GSTp, but a subset of lung metastases were negative (P = 0.021). Univariate analysis revealed that shorter overall survival (OS) was associated with negative catalase expression of the tumor (P = 0.026). Furthermore, univariate analyses according to the metastatic sites revealed that shorter OS was associated with TxNIP-positive tumors (P = 0.032) and the expression of stromal catalase (P = 0.032) in brain metastases. Tumors that were negative for MnSOD expression (P < 0.001) but positive for stromal catalase expression (P = 0.022) were associated with shorter OS in patients with liver metastases. In conclusion, cancer cells and stromal tissues showed different ROS-related protein expression patterns according to the metastatic site. In addition, the expression of ROS-related proteins is associated with patient prognosis.",
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Expression of reactive oxygen species-related proteins in metastatic breast cancer is dependent on the metastatic site. / Kim, Hye Min; Jung, Woo Hee; Koo, Ja Seung.

In: International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Pathology, Vol. 7, No. 12, 01.01.2014, p. 8802-8812.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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