Extranodal nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma

Computed tomography findings of head and neck involvement

Jinna Kim, Eung Yeop Kim, Seung Koo Lee, Dong Ik Kim, Chang-Hoon Kim, Se Heon Kim, Eun Chang Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Extranodal nasal-type natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (NKTL) is a rare, but distinct clinical entity in Asian populations. However, it is not uncommon for NKTL to be belatedly or postoperatively diagnosed because radiologists are not familiar with its radiological features. Purpose: To investigate the computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with extranodal nasal-type NKTL involving the head and neck. Material and Methods: Twenty-nine patients (18 male, 11 female; mean age 51.5 years) with pathologically proven extranodal nasal-type NKTL were enrolled in this study. Two head-and-neck radiologists retrospectively evaluated the CT scans with special attention to the primary site, the extent of involvement, and patterns of the lesions (i.e., morphologic features, ulceration or necrosis, and bone destruction). Results: The cases of nasal-type NKTL consisted of primary tumors arising from the sinonasal cavity in 13 patients (45%), the naso/oropharynx in three patients (10%), and simultaneous involvement in the nasal cavity and naso/oropharynx in 13 patients (45%). Fourteen patients (48%) showed tumor extension into adjacent structures. Of the 26 patients with involvement of the nasal cavity, 18 (69%) presented with an infiltrative pattern, seven (27%) with a polypoid pattern, and one (4%) with a combined pattern. Areas of necrosis within the tumor were observed in six patients (21%), bone destruction in five (17%), and regional lymphadenopathies in two (7%). Conclusion: Extranodal NKTL may be initially suggested by CT findings in the head and neck. Clinicians should consider these findings indicative of the possibility of NKTL, and should perform a histopathologic confirmation to establish a diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)164-169
Number of pages6
JournalActa Radiologica
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Feb 22

Fingerprint

Natural Killer T-Cells
T-Cell Lymphoma
Nose
Neck
Head
Tomography
Extranodal NK-T-Cell Lymphoma
Natural Killer Cells
Oropharynx
Nasal Cavity
Neoplasms
Osteonecrosis
Necrosis
Bone and Bones

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Kim, Jinna ; Kim, Eung Yeop ; Lee, Seung Koo ; Kim, Dong Ik ; Kim, Chang-Hoon ; Kim, Se Heon ; Choi, Eun Chang. / Extranodal nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma : Computed tomography findings of head and neck involvement. In: Acta Radiologica. 2010 ; Vol. 51, No. 2. pp. 164-169.
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title = "Extranodal nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma: Computed tomography findings of head and neck involvement",
abstract = "Background: Extranodal nasal-type natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (NKTL) is a rare, but distinct clinical entity in Asian populations. However, it is not uncommon for NKTL to be belatedly or postoperatively diagnosed because radiologists are not familiar with its radiological features. Purpose: To investigate the computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with extranodal nasal-type NKTL involving the head and neck. Material and Methods: Twenty-nine patients (18 male, 11 female; mean age 51.5 years) with pathologically proven extranodal nasal-type NKTL were enrolled in this study. Two head-and-neck radiologists retrospectively evaluated the CT scans with special attention to the primary site, the extent of involvement, and patterns of the lesions (i.e., morphologic features, ulceration or necrosis, and bone destruction). Results: The cases of nasal-type NKTL consisted of primary tumors arising from the sinonasal cavity in 13 patients (45{\%}), the naso/oropharynx in three patients (10{\%}), and simultaneous involvement in the nasal cavity and naso/oropharynx in 13 patients (45{\%}). Fourteen patients (48{\%}) showed tumor extension into adjacent structures. Of the 26 patients with involvement of the nasal cavity, 18 (69{\%}) presented with an infiltrative pattern, seven (27{\%}) with a polypoid pattern, and one (4{\%}) with a combined pattern. Areas of necrosis within the tumor were observed in six patients (21{\%}), bone destruction in five (17{\%}), and regional lymphadenopathies in two (7{\%}). Conclusion: Extranodal NKTL may be initially suggested by CT findings in the head and neck. Clinicians should consider these findings indicative of the possibility of NKTL, and should perform a histopathologic confirmation to establish a diagnosis.",
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Extranodal nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma : Computed tomography findings of head and neck involvement. / Kim, Jinna; Kim, Eung Yeop; Lee, Seung Koo; Kim, Dong Ik; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Se Heon; Choi, Eun Chang.

In: Acta Radiologica, Vol. 51, No. 2, 22.02.2010, p. 164-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Extranodal nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma

T2 - Computed tomography findings of head and neck involvement

AU - Kim, Jinna

AU - Kim, Eung Yeop

AU - Lee, Seung Koo

AU - Kim, Dong Ik

AU - Kim, Chang-Hoon

AU - Kim, Se Heon

AU - Choi, Eun Chang

PY - 2010/2/22

Y1 - 2010/2/22

N2 - Background: Extranodal nasal-type natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (NKTL) is a rare, but distinct clinical entity in Asian populations. However, it is not uncommon for NKTL to be belatedly or postoperatively diagnosed because radiologists are not familiar with its radiological features. Purpose: To investigate the computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with extranodal nasal-type NKTL involving the head and neck. Material and Methods: Twenty-nine patients (18 male, 11 female; mean age 51.5 years) with pathologically proven extranodal nasal-type NKTL were enrolled in this study. Two head-and-neck radiologists retrospectively evaluated the CT scans with special attention to the primary site, the extent of involvement, and patterns of the lesions (i.e., morphologic features, ulceration or necrosis, and bone destruction). Results: The cases of nasal-type NKTL consisted of primary tumors arising from the sinonasal cavity in 13 patients (45%), the naso/oropharynx in three patients (10%), and simultaneous involvement in the nasal cavity and naso/oropharynx in 13 patients (45%). Fourteen patients (48%) showed tumor extension into adjacent structures. Of the 26 patients with involvement of the nasal cavity, 18 (69%) presented with an infiltrative pattern, seven (27%) with a polypoid pattern, and one (4%) with a combined pattern. Areas of necrosis within the tumor were observed in six patients (21%), bone destruction in five (17%), and regional lymphadenopathies in two (7%). Conclusion: Extranodal NKTL may be initially suggested by CT findings in the head and neck. Clinicians should consider these findings indicative of the possibility of NKTL, and should perform a histopathologic confirmation to establish a diagnosis.

AB - Background: Extranodal nasal-type natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (NKTL) is a rare, but distinct clinical entity in Asian populations. However, it is not uncommon for NKTL to be belatedly or postoperatively diagnosed because radiologists are not familiar with its radiological features. Purpose: To investigate the computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with extranodal nasal-type NKTL involving the head and neck. Material and Methods: Twenty-nine patients (18 male, 11 female; mean age 51.5 years) with pathologically proven extranodal nasal-type NKTL were enrolled in this study. Two head-and-neck radiologists retrospectively evaluated the CT scans with special attention to the primary site, the extent of involvement, and patterns of the lesions (i.e., morphologic features, ulceration or necrosis, and bone destruction). Results: The cases of nasal-type NKTL consisted of primary tumors arising from the sinonasal cavity in 13 patients (45%), the naso/oropharynx in three patients (10%), and simultaneous involvement in the nasal cavity and naso/oropharynx in 13 patients (45%). Fourteen patients (48%) showed tumor extension into adjacent structures. Of the 26 patients with involvement of the nasal cavity, 18 (69%) presented with an infiltrative pattern, seven (27%) with a polypoid pattern, and one (4%) with a combined pattern. Areas of necrosis within the tumor were observed in six patients (21%), bone destruction in five (17%), and regional lymphadenopathies in two (7%). Conclusion: Extranodal NKTL may be initially suggested by CT findings in the head and neck. Clinicians should consider these findings indicative of the possibility of NKTL, and should perform a histopathologic confirmation to establish a diagnosis.

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