Facebook friends with (health) benefits? Exploring social network site use and perceptions of social support, stress, and well-being

Robin L. Nabi, Abby Prestin, Jiyeon So

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

149 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is clear evidence that interpersonal social support impacts stress levels and, in turn, degree of physical illness and psychological well-being. This study examines whether mediated social networks serve the same palliative function. A survey of 401 undergraduate Facebook users revealed that, as predicted, number of Facebook friends associated with stronger perceptions of social support, which in turn associated with reduced stress, and in turn less physical illness and greater well-being. This effect was minimized when interpersonal network size was taken into consideration. However, for those who have experienced many objective life stressors, the number of Facebook friends emerged as the stronger predictor of perceived social support. The "more-friends-the-better" heuristic is proposed as the most likely explanation for these findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)721-727
Number of pages7
JournalCyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
Volume16
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jan 10

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facebook
Insurance Benefits
Social Support
social support
social network
well-being
Health
illness
health
heuristics
Psychology
evidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Communication
  • Applied Psychology
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

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Facebook friends with (health) benefits? Exploring social network site use and perceptions of social support, stress, and well-being. / Nabi, Robin L.; Prestin, Abby; So, Jiyeon.

In: Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, Vol. 16, No. 10, 10.01.2013, p. 721-727.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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