Family factors contributing to emotional and behavioral problems in Korean adolescents with epilepsy

Korean QoL in Epilepsy Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We aimed to determine whether different aspects of family functioning are associated with emotional and behavioral problems in adolescents with epilepsy and, if not, to document any indirect associations mediated by other family factors. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study. A total of 297 adolescents with epilepsy and their parents participated. Adolescent psychopathology was measured using the Youth Self-Report. Family factors were classified into proximal (parent–child interaction), distal (parent characteristics), and contextual factors (family characteristics) in accordance to their level of proximity to the adolescent's everyday life. Regression analyses were used to analyze the unique and combined predictive power of family factors in relation to psychopathology. Results: In total, 44 (14.8%) and 51 (17.2%) adolescents with epilepsy scored above the borderline cutoff (T-score ≥ 60) of internalizing and externalizing problems, respectively. Proximal and distal factors were independently associated with both internalizing and externalizing problems. High levels of parental depressive mood and parental overcontrol were the strongest factors contributing to internalizing and externalizing problems, respectively. Contextual factors were indirectly associated with both internalizing and externalizing problems through more proximal factors. Conclusions: Both proximal and distal family factors affect psychopathology in Korean adolescents with epilepsy. Parental feelings of depression and parental overcontrol are the strongest factors contributing to internalizing and externalizing problems, respectively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)66-72
Number of pages7
JournalEpilepsy and Behavior
Volume56
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Mar 1

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Epilepsy
Psychopathology
Problem Behavior
Self Report
Multicenter Studies
Emotions
Cross-Sectional Studies
Parents
Regression Analysis
Depression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

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title = "Family factors contributing to emotional and behavioral problems in Korean adolescents with epilepsy",
abstract = "Purpose: We aimed to determine whether different aspects of family functioning are associated with emotional and behavioral problems in adolescents with epilepsy and, if not, to document any indirect associations mediated by other family factors. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study. A total of 297 adolescents with epilepsy and their parents participated. Adolescent psychopathology was measured using the Youth Self-Report. Family factors were classified into proximal (parent–child interaction), distal (parent characteristics), and contextual factors (family characteristics) in accordance to their level of proximity to the adolescent's everyday life. Regression analyses were used to analyze the unique and combined predictive power of family factors in relation to psychopathology. Results: In total, 44 (14.8{\%}) and 51 (17.2{\%}) adolescents with epilepsy scored above the borderline cutoff (T-score ≥ 60) of internalizing and externalizing problems, respectively. Proximal and distal factors were independently associated with both internalizing and externalizing problems. High levels of parental depressive mood and parental overcontrol were the strongest factors contributing to internalizing and externalizing problems, respectively. Contextual factors were indirectly associated with both internalizing and externalizing problems through more proximal factors. Conclusions: Both proximal and distal family factors affect psychopathology in Korean adolescents with epilepsy. Parental feelings of depression and parental overcontrol are the strongest factors contributing to internalizing and externalizing problems, respectively.",
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Family factors contributing to emotional and behavioral problems in Korean adolescents with epilepsy. / Korean QoL in Epilepsy Study Group.

In: Epilepsy and Behavior, Vol. 56, 01.03.2016, p. 66-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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