Family planning practice and related factors of married women in Ethiopia

I. S. Ko, M. A. You, E. S. Kim, Taewha Lee, Sue Kim, Y. M. Kim, J. J. Nam, Hyeonkyeong Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The family planning (FP) practice rate of Ethiopian women of reproductive age is lower than in most other sub-Saharan African countries. Aim: To examine the status of FP practice and identify intrapersonal, interpersonal and community factors associated with FP practice among married Ethiopian women in a rural area. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted with a convenient sample of 193 married women of reproductive age. A structured questionnaire, which was modified based on the Ethiopian Demographic Health Survey, was used. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify factors associated with FP practice at three levels: intrapersonal, interpersonal and community. Results: Almost 67% of women were currently using at least one FP method and most women obtained FP methods from the public health sector. Short-term methods such as pills and injections were most commonly used. FP practice was significantly associated with willingness to use long-term or permanent FP methods in future and spousal discussion about FP. Conclusions: Both intrapersonal and interpersonal factors were related to FP practice. Community factors, however, need to be further assessed using various methods to plan a comprehensive and more culturally acceptable community-based FP program. Caution is needed to generalize the findings because of the convenient sample, but community-based FP programs emphasizing long-term or permanent methods and male involvement in FP counseling would be successful strategies to increase FP practice. Implications for nursing practice: Nurses and midwives need to be trained to provide knowledge and skills for long-term or permanent FP methods for service quality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)377-382
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Nursing Review
Volume57
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Sep 1

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Ethiopia
Family Practice
Family Planning Services
Nurse Midwives
Public Sector

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

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Ko, I. S. ; You, M. A. ; Kim, E. S. ; Lee, Taewha ; Kim, Sue ; Kim, Y. M. ; Nam, J. J. ; Lee, Hyeonkyeong. / Family planning practice and related factors of married women in Ethiopia. In: International Nursing Review. 2010 ; Vol. 57, No. 3. pp. 377-382.
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Family planning practice and related factors of married women in Ethiopia. / Ko, I. S.; You, M. A.; Kim, E. S.; Lee, Taewha; Kim, Sue; Kim, Y. M.; Nam, J. J.; Lee, Hyeonkyeong.

In: International Nursing Review, Vol. 57, No. 3, 01.09.2010, p. 377-382.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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