Fast and efficient correction of ground moving targets in a synthetic aperture radar, single-look complex image

Jeong Won Park, Jae Hun Kim, Joong Sun Won

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ground moving targets distort normally-focused synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Since most high-resolution SAR data providers only offer single-look complex (SLC) data rather than raw signals to general users, they need to apply a simple and efficient residual SAR focusing to SLC data containing moving targets. This paper presents an efficient and effective SAR residual focusing method that is practically applicable to SLC data. The residual Doppler spectrum of the moving target is derived from a general SAR configuration and normal SAR focusing. The processing steps are simple and straightforward, with a limited size of the processing window, e.g., 64 × 64. Application results using simulation data and actual TerraSAR-X SLC data with a speed-controlled vehicle demonstrate the effectiveness of the method, which particularly improves the -3 dB width, integrated sidelobe ratio, and symmetry of the reconstructed signals. In particular, the azimuthal symmetry becomes seriously distorted when the target speed is higher than 8 m/s (or 28.8 km/h), and the symmetry is well recovered by the proposed method.

Original languageEnglish
Article number926
JournalRemote Sensing
Volume9
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Sep 1

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Acknowledgments: This work was supported by the National Space Lab program through the Korea Science and Engineering Foundation funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (2013M1A3A3A02042314. The TerraSAR-X data were provided to J.-S. Won as a part of TerraSAR-X Science Team Project (PI No. COA0047).

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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