Femtosecond cellular transfection using a nondiffracting light beam

X. Tsampoula, V. Garćs-Chávez, M. Comrie, D. J. Stevenson, B. Agate, C. T.A. Brown, F. Gunn-Moore, K. Dholakia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

129 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability to permeate selectively the cell membrane and introduce therapeutic agents is a key goal in cell biology. Optical transfection is a powerful methodology but requires exact focusing due to the required two-photon power density. The authors use a Bessel beam that obviates the need to locate precisely the cell membrane, permitting two-photon excitation along a line leading to cell transfection. Assuming a minimum efficiency of 20%, the Bessel beam offers transfection at axial distances 20 times greater than that of its Gaussian equivalent. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate cell transfection beyond obstacles due to the self-healing nature of the Bessel beam.

Original languageEnglish
Article number053902
JournalApplied Physics Letters
Volume91
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Aug 10

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light beams
healing
photons
cells
radiant flux density
methodology
excitation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Tsampoula, X., Garćs-Chávez, V., Comrie, M., Stevenson, D. J., Agate, B., Brown, C. T. A., ... Dholakia, K. (2007). Femtosecond cellular transfection using a nondiffracting light beam. Applied Physics Letters, 91(5), [053902]. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2766835
Tsampoula, X. ; Garćs-Chávez, V. ; Comrie, M. ; Stevenson, D. J. ; Agate, B. ; Brown, C. T.A. ; Gunn-Moore, F. ; Dholakia, K. / Femtosecond cellular transfection using a nondiffracting light beam. In: Applied Physics Letters. 2007 ; Vol. 91, No. 5.
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Tsampoula, X, Garćs-Chávez, V, Comrie, M, Stevenson, DJ, Agate, B, Brown, CTA, Gunn-Moore, F & Dholakia, K 2007, 'Femtosecond cellular transfection using a nondiffracting light beam', Applied Physics Letters, vol. 91, no. 5, 053902. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2766835

Femtosecond cellular transfection using a nondiffracting light beam. / Tsampoula, X.; Garćs-Chávez, V.; Comrie, M.; Stevenson, D. J.; Agate, B.; Brown, C. T.A.; Gunn-Moore, F.; Dholakia, K.

In: Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 91, No. 5, 053902, 10.08.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Tsampoula X, Garćs-Chávez V, Comrie M, Stevenson DJ, Agate B, Brown CTA et al. Femtosecond cellular transfection using a nondiffracting light beam. Applied Physics Letters. 2007 Aug 10;91(5). 053902. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2766835