Flapless implant surgery using a mini-incision

Seung Mi Jeong, Byung Ho Choi, Feng Xuan, Ha Rang Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Traditional flapless implant surgery using a soft tissue punch device requires a circumferential excision of keratinized tissue at the implant site. A new flapless implant technique that can submerge implant fixtures is needed. Purpose: This article describes a flapless implant surgery method using a mini-incision and compares the effects of soft tissue punch and mini-incision surgery on both the amount of osseointegration and the bone height around the implants using a canine mandible model. Materials and Methods: Bilateral, edentulated, flat alveolar ridges were created in the mandibles of six mongrel dogs. After a 3-month healing period, two implants were placed on each side of the mandible using either soft tissue punch or mini-incision procedures. After an additional 3-month healing period, a second stage surgery and transmucosal abutment attachment was performed for mini-incision implant cases. Following a 2-month healing period, the dogs were sacrificed to evaluate the osseointegration and bone height around the implants. Results: Average bone height was 9.6±0.4mm in the soft tissue punch group and 9.8±0.3mm in the mini-incision group (p>.05). Average osseointegration was 70.4±6.3% in the soft tissue punch group and 71.2±7.1% in the mini-incision group (p>.05). No significant differences were noted between the two groups in vertical alveolar ridge height or bone/implant contact. Conclusions: Our findings support the clinical use of mini-incision implant surgery at sites where implants need to be protected below the soft tissue during the early phase of healing, particularly for patients with poor bone quality and/or low primary implant stability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)74-79
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Mar 1

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Osseointegration
Bone and Bones
Mandible
Alveolar Process
Dogs
Canidae
Equipment and Supplies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Oral Surgery

Cite this

Jeong, Seung Mi ; Choi, Byung Ho ; Xuan, Feng ; Kim, Ha Rang. / Flapless implant surgery using a mini-incision. In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research. 2012 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 74-79.
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title = "Flapless implant surgery using a mini-incision",
abstract = "Background: Traditional flapless implant surgery using a soft tissue punch device requires a circumferential excision of keratinized tissue at the implant site. A new flapless implant technique that can submerge implant fixtures is needed. Purpose: This article describes a flapless implant surgery method using a mini-incision and compares the effects of soft tissue punch and mini-incision surgery on both the amount of osseointegration and the bone height around the implants using a canine mandible model. Materials and Methods: Bilateral, edentulated, flat alveolar ridges were created in the mandibles of six mongrel dogs. After a 3-month healing period, two implants were placed on each side of the mandible using either soft tissue punch or mini-incision procedures. After an additional 3-month healing period, a second stage surgery and transmucosal abutment attachment was performed for mini-incision implant cases. Following a 2-month healing period, the dogs were sacrificed to evaluate the osseointegration and bone height around the implants. Results: Average bone height was 9.6±0.4mm in the soft tissue punch group and 9.8±0.3mm in the mini-incision group (p>.05). Average osseointegration was 70.4±6.3{\%} in the soft tissue punch group and 71.2±7.1{\%} in the mini-incision group (p>.05). No significant differences were noted between the two groups in vertical alveolar ridge height or bone/implant contact. Conclusions: Our findings support the clinical use of mini-incision implant surgery at sites where implants need to be protected below the soft tissue during the early phase of healing, particularly for patients with poor bone quality and/or low primary implant stability.",
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Flapless implant surgery using a mini-incision. / Jeong, Seung Mi; Choi, Byung Ho; Xuan, Feng; Kim, Ha Rang.

In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, Vol. 14, No. 1, 01.03.2012, p. 74-79.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Background: Traditional flapless implant surgery using a soft tissue punch device requires a circumferential excision of keratinized tissue at the implant site. A new flapless implant technique that can submerge implant fixtures is needed. Purpose: This article describes a flapless implant surgery method using a mini-incision and compares the effects of soft tissue punch and mini-incision surgery on both the amount of osseointegration and the bone height around the implants using a canine mandible model. Materials and Methods: Bilateral, edentulated, flat alveolar ridges were created in the mandibles of six mongrel dogs. After a 3-month healing period, two implants were placed on each side of the mandible using either soft tissue punch or mini-incision procedures. After an additional 3-month healing period, a second stage surgery and transmucosal abutment attachment was performed for mini-incision implant cases. Following a 2-month healing period, the dogs were sacrificed to evaluate the osseointegration and bone height around the implants. Results: Average bone height was 9.6±0.4mm in the soft tissue punch group and 9.8±0.3mm in the mini-incision group (p>.05). Average osseointegration was 70.4±6.3% in the soft tissue punch group and 71.2±7.1% in the mini-incision group (p>.05). No significant differences were noted between the two groups in vertical alveolar ridge height or bone/implant contact. Conclusions: Our findings support the clinical use of mini-incision implant surgery at sites where implants need to be protected below the soft tissue during the early phase of healing, particularly for patients with poor bone quality and/or low primary implant stability.

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