Flow Dynamics of CO2/brine at the Interface Between the Storage Formation and Sealing Units in a Multi-layered Model

Kue Young Kim, Weon Shik Han, Junho Oh, Eungyu Park, Pyeong Koo Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pressure distribution and $$\hbox {CO}_{2}$$CO2 plume migration are two major interests in $$\hbox {CO}_{2}$$CO2 geologic storage as they determine the injectivity and storage capacity. In this study, we adopted a three-layer model comprising a storage formation and the over- and underlying seals and determined three distinct flow regions based on the vertical flux exchange of $$\hbox {CO}_{2}$$CO2 and native brine. Regions 1 and 2 showed $$\hbox {CO}_{2}$$CO2 flowing from the storage formation to adjacent seals with counter-flowing brine. The characteristics of these fluxes in Region 1 were governed by permeability change due to salt precipitation whereas buoyancy force controlled the flux pattern in Region 2. Region 3 showed brine flowing from storage formation toward the over- and underlying seals, which enabled the displaced brine to escape from the storage formation and make room for $$\hbox {CO}_{2}$$CO2 to store as well as reduce the pressure build-up. In the multi-layered model, the counter-flowing brine in flow Region 1 resulted in localized salt precipitation at the upper and lower boundary of storage formation. We assessed the bottom-hole pressure and $$\hbox {CO}_{2}$$CO2 mass in caprock with respect to reservoir size. While the formation thickness influenced the bottom-hole pressure in the early stage of injection, the horizontal extension of the reservoir was more influential to pressure build-up during the injection period, and to the stabilized pressure during the post-injection period. The $$\hbox {CO}_{2}$$CO2 mass in caprock gently increased during the injection period as well as during the post-injection period and reached about 4–5 % of injected $$\hbox {CO}_{2}$$CO2. The percentage of escaped brine from the storage formation ranged from 80–100 % of the $$\hbox {CO}_{2}$$CO2 mass stored in the storage formation depending on the reservoir scale.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)611-633
Number of pages23
JournalTransport in Porous Media
Volume105
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Dec 1

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Carbon Monoxide
Bottom hole pressure
Seals
Fluxes
Salts
Buoyancy
Pressure distribution
brine

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Catalysis
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

Kim, Kue Young ; Han, Weon Shik ; Oh, Junho ; Park, Eungyu ; Lee, Pyeong Koo. / Flow Dynamics of CO2/brine at the Interface Between the Storage Formation and Sealing Units in a Multi-layered Model. In: Transport in Porous Media. 2014 ; Vol. 105, No. 3. pp. 611-633.
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abstract = "Pressure distribution and $$\hbox {CO}_{2}$$CO2 plume migration are two major interests in $$\hbox {CO}_{2}$$CO2 geologic storage as they determine the injectivity and storage capacity. In this study, we adopted a three-layer model comprising a storage formation and the over- and underlying seals and determined three distinct flow regions based on the vertical flux exchange of $$\hbox {CO}_{2}$$CO2 and native brine. Regions 1 and 2 showed $$\hbox {CO}_{2}$$CO2 flowing from the storage formation to adjacent seals with counter-flowing brine. The characteristics of these fluxes in Region 1 were governed by permeability change due to salt precipitation whereas buoyancy force controlled the flux pattern in Region 2. Region 3 showed brine flowing from storage formation toward the over- and underlying seals, which enabled the displaced brine to escape from the storage formation and make room for $$\hbox {CO}_{2}$$CO2 to store as well as reduce the pressure build-up. In the multi-layered model, the counter-flowing brine in flow Region 1 resulted in localized salt precipitation at the upper and lower boundary of storage formation. We assessed the bottom-hole pressure and $$\hbox {CO}_{2}$$CO2 mass in caprock with respect to reservoir size. While the formation thickness influenced the bottom-hole pressure in the early stage of injection, the horizontal extension of the reservoir was more influential to pressure build-up during the injection period, and to the stabilized pressure during the post-injection period. The $$\hbox {CO}_{2}$$CO2 mass in caprock gently increased during the injection period as well as during the post-injection period and reached about 4–5 {\%} of injected $$\hbox {CO}_{2}$$CO2. The percentage of escaped brine from the storage formation ranged from 80–100 {\%} of the $$\hbox {CO}_{2}$$CO2 mass stored in the storage formation depending on the reservoir scale.",
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Flow Dynamics of CO2/brine at the Interface Between the Storage Formation and Sealing Units in a Multi-layered Model. / Kim, Kue Young; Han, Weon Shik; Oh, Junho; Park, Eungyu; Lee, Pyeong Koo.

In: Transport in Porous Media, Vol. 105, No. 3, 01.12.2014, p. 611-633.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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