From U-2s to drones: U.S. Aerial espionage and targeted killing during the cold war and the war on terror

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Since September 11, 2001, the United States has been relying heavily on drone strikes for counterterrorism. This policy remains controversial. I argue that assertive statecraft is needed to prevent drone strikes from undermining U.S. foreign and security policy over the long term. The article argues legally, comparatively, and historically, using President’s Eisenhower restrictions on U.S. aerial espionage programs during the earlier Cold War, as a benchmark for President Obama’s policy on missions by armed drones. A more limited drone program offers a better balance between what is necessary for security and what is politically sustainable.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)218-238
Number of pages21
JournalComparative Strategy
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Mar 15

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espionage
strike
cold war
terrorism
president
September 11, 2001
security policy
foreign policy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

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From U-2s to drones : U.S. Aerial espionage and targeted killing during the cold war and the war on terror. / Maass, Matthias.

In: Comparative Strategy, Vol. 34, No. 2, 15.03.2015, p. 218-238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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