Gene-environment interplay and delinquent involvement

Evidence of direct, indirect, and interactive effects

Kevin M. Beaver, Matt Delisi, John Paul Wright, Michael George Vaughn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Behavioral genetic research has revealed that biogenic factors play a role in the development of antisocial behaviors. Much of this research has also explicated the way in which the environment and genes may combine to create different phenotypes. The authors draw heavily from this literature and use data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to examine genetic and environmental effects on adolescent delinquent involvement. The results of the multivariate models reveal that genetic factors have a direct effect on youthful misconduct. Most important, however, is that genetic factors interact with delinquent peers and with low self-control to predict variation in delinquency. Analysis of the Add Health data also provide evidence suggesting that there is a shared genetic pathway to delinquent involvement, to antisocial peer group formation, and to the development of low self-control.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-168
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Adolescent Research
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Mar 1

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heredity
self-control
National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health
adolescent
Behavioral Genetics
Behavioral Research
group formation
Peer Group
genetic research
Genetic Research
Genetic Models
peer group
delinquency
health
Genes
evidence
longitudinal study
Phenotype
Health
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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Gene-environment interplay and delinquent involvement : Evidence of direct, indirect, and interactive effects. / Beaver, Kevin M.; Delisi, Matt; Wright, John Paul; Vaughn, Michael George.

In: Journal of Adolescent Research, Vol. 24, No. 2, 01.03.2009, p. 147-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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