Gene-environment interplay and the importance of self-control in predicting polydrug use and substance-related problems

Michael G. Vaughn, Kevin M. Beaver, Matt DeLisi, Brian E. Perron, Lisa Schelbe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), the current study applies a general biosocial theoretical model to polydrug use and associated substance-related problems. Along with measures of molecular genetic polymorphisms, neurocognitive skills, self-control, and environmental pathogens a recursive path modeling strategy was used to empirically examine the relations between these biosocial measures and polydrug use, alcohol, and drug-related problems in a subsample of 1136 adolescent males (Mean age = 21.96, SD = 1.73). Results supported the main predictions of the biosocial model finding significant path coefficients across key constructs. In particular, the role of poor self-regulation was found to be sturdy across path models.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)112-116
Number of pages5
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Jan 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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