Genetic control of mammalian T-cell proliferation with a synthetic RNA regulatory system - illusion or reality?

SangKil Lee, George A. Calin

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

Synthetic RNA-based regulatory systems are used to program higher-level biological functions that could be exploited, among many applications, for in vivo diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Chen and colleagues have recently reported a significant technological advance by producing an RNA modular device based on a hammerhead ribozyme and successfully tested its ability to control the proliferation of mammalian T lymphocytes. Like all exciting research, this work raises a lot of significant questions. How quickly will such knowledge be translated into clinical practice? How efficient will this system be in human clinical trials involving adaptive T-cell therapy? We discuss the possible advantages of using such new technologies for specific therapeutic applications.

Original languageEnglish
Article number77
JournalGenome Medicine
Volume2
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Oct 15

Fingerprint

Cell Proliferation
RNA
T-Lymphocytes
Aptitude
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Clinical Trials
Technology
Equipment and Supplies
Therapeutics
Research
hammerhead ribozyme

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Molecular Medicine

Cite this

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Genetic control of mammalian T-cell proliferation with a synthetic RNA regulatory system - illusion or reality? / Lee, SangKil; Calin, George A.

In: Genome Medicine, Vol. 2, No. 10, 77, 15.10.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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