Genetic polymorphisms of ADRB2 and IL10 May be associated with the risk of IgE sensitization to digestive powders in exposed medical personnel

Young Min Ye, Hyun Young Lee, Sang Hoon Kim, Sang Ha Kim, Seung Hyun Kim, Hae Sim Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: It has been reported that pancreatic extracts may induce IgE-mediated respiratory allergy in medical personnel. The aim of the study was to identify genetic factors associated with IgE sensitization to digestive powders containing pancreatic extract. Methods: This case-control study was performed on 153 subjects routinely exposed to digestive powder and on 123 nonexposed controls working in Ajou University Hospital. Skin prick testing was performed using 4 commonly used digestive powders and α-amylase. Serum specific IgE levels were measured by ELISA. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms, ADRB2 46A>G, IL10 -1082A>G and IL4 -589T>C, were genotyped using the single base extension method. Results: The positive rate of serum specific IgE to digestive powder was significantly higher in the 41 (26.8%) exposed personnel with work-related respiratory symptoms than in controls (24.4 vs. 5.4%, p = 0.012). Thirty-nine (25.5%) of the 153 exposed personnel were found to have an allergy to digestive powder, as determined by a positive skin prick test and/or a high serum specific IgE level to digestive powder. The ADRB2 46A>G and IL10 -1082A>G polymorphisms were found to be significantly associated with the development of an allergy to digestive powder in exposed medical personnel by multiple logistic regression analysis after controlling for age, atopy and job type (pharmacist or nurse; p = 0.035 and p = 0.027, respectively). Conclusion: These results suggest that the genetic polymorphisms ADRB2 46A>G and IL10 -1082A>G are genetic factors that increase IgE sensitization to pancreatic extracts in medical personnel occupationally exposed to digestive powders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-200
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Archives of Allergy and Immunology
Volume153
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Sep 1

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Genetic Polymorphisms
Interleukin-10
Powders
Immunoglobulin E
Pancreatic Extracts
Hypersensitivity
Serum
Amylases
Skin Tests
Pharmacists
Interleukin-4
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Case-Control Studies
Logistic Models
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Nurses
Regression Analysis
Skin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

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title = "Genetic polymorphisms of ADRB2 and IL10 May be associated with the risk of IgE sensitization to digestive powders in exposed medical personnel",
abstract = "Background: It has been reported that pancreatic extracts may induce IgE-mediated respiratory allergy in medical personnel. The aim of the study was to identify genetic factors associated with IgE sensitization to digestive powders containing pancreatic extract. Methods: This case-control study was performed on 153 subjects routinely exposed to digestive powder and on 123 nonexposed controls working in Ajou University Hospital. Skin prick testing was performed using 4 commonly used digestive powders and α-amylase. Serum specific IgE levels were measured by ELISA. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms, ADRB2 46A>G, IL10 -1082A>G and IL4 -589T>C, were genotyped using the single base extension method. Results: The positive rate of serum specific IgE to digestive powder was significantly higher in the 41 (26.8{\%}) exposed personnel with work-related respiratory symptoms than in controls (24.4 vs. 5.4{\%}, p = 0.012). Thirty-nine (25.5{\%}) of the 153 exposed personnel were found to have an allergy to digestive powder, as determined by a positive skin prick test and/or a high serum specific IgE level to digestive powder. The ADRB2 46A>G and IL10 -1082A>G polymorphisms were found to be significantly associated with the development of an allergy to digestive powder in exposed medical personnel by multiple logistic regression analysis after controlling for age, atopy and job type (pharmacist or nurse; p = 0.035 and p = 0.027, respectively). Conclusion: These results suggest that the genetic polymorphisms ADRB2 46A>G and IL10 -1082A>G are genetic factors that increase IgE sensitization to pancreatic extracts in medical personnel occupationally exposed to digestive powders.",
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Genetic polymorphisms of ADRB2 and IL10 May be associated with the risk of IgE sensitization to digestive powders in exposed medical personnel. / Ye, Young Min; Lee, Hyun Young; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Sang Ha; Kim, Seung Hyun; Park, Hae Sim.

In: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, Vol. 153, No. 2, 01.09.2010, p. 193-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Kim, Seung Hyun

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N2 - Background: It has been reported that pancreatic extracts may induce IgE-mediated respiratory allergy in medical personnel. The aim of the study was to identify genetic factors associated with IgE sensitization to digestive powders containing pancreatic extract. Methods: This case-control study was performed on 153 subjects routinely exposed to digestive powder and on 123 nonexposed controls working in Ajou University Hospital. Skin prick testing was performed using 4 commonly used digestive powders and α-amylase. Serum specific IgE levels were measured by ELISA. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms, ADRB2 46A>G, IL10 -1082A>G and IL4 -589T>C, were genotyped using the single base extension method. Results: The positive rate of serum specific IgE to digestive powder was significantly higher in the 41 (26.8%) exposed personnel with work-related respiratory symptoms than in controls (24.4 vs. 5.4%, p = 0.012). Thirty-nine (25.5%) of the 153 exposed personnel were found to have an allergy to digestive powder, as determined by a positive skin prick test and/or a high serum specific IgE level to digestive powder. The ADRB2 46A>G and IL10 -1082A>G polymorphisms were found to be significantly associated with the development of an allergy to digestive powder in exposed medical personnel by multiple logistic regression analysis after controlling for age, atopy and job type (pharmacist or nurse; p = 0.035 and p = 0.027, respectively). Conclusion: These results suggest that the genetic polymorphisms ADRB2 46A>G and IL10 -1082A>G are genetic factors that increase IgE sensitization to pancreatic extracts in medical personnel occupationally exposed to digestive powders.

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