GH-binding protein in obese men with varying glucose tolerance

Relationship to body fat distribution, insulin secretion and the GH-IGF-I axis

Su Youn Nam, Kyung Rae Kim, Young Duk Song, Sungkil Lim, Hyun Chul Lee, Kap Bum Huh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bioelectrical impedance for measurement of total body fat and computed tomography for visceral and subcutaneous fat at umbilicus levels were performed in 34 obese and 10 lean men. Insulin secretion in response to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and a GH stimulation test by L-dopa, growth hormone-binding protein (GHBP) and IGF-I were measured. Obese subjects were divided into three groups according to the OGTT. The obese type II diabetes mellitus group had the highest GHBP levels and the most visceral fat. GHBP levels were most strongly correlated with the ratio of visceral fat area to body weight (VWR) above any other parameters (r = 0.725, P < 0.001). The insulin and free fatty acid (FFA) areas under curves (AUC) during the OGTT, and the IGF-I level, were also positively correlated with GHBP levels (r=0.474, P<0.005; r=0.572, P<0.005; r=0.453, P<0.005). GH-AUC to the L-dopa stimulation test was negatively correlated with GHBP levels (r=-0.432, P < 0.005). Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that VWR, FFA- AUC and insulin-AUC significantly contributed to the variability of GHBP (r2= 0.58). In conclusion, we demonstrated that: (i) visceral fat amount mainly determined GHBP levels in obese men with varying glucose tolerance; (ii) hyperglycemia per se did not influence the GHBP level, whereas insulin and FFA could play a role in regulation of GHBP; and (iii) although GH was not the main regulator of GHBP, the unchanged IGF-I level despite GH hyposecretion suggests that increased GHBP levels reflect GH hypersensitivity in order to compensate for decreased GH secretion in obesity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-163
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Endocrinology
Volume140
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999 Feb 1

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Body Fat Distribution
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Insulin
Glucose
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Area Under Curve
Glucose Tolerance Test
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Levodopa
somatotropin-binding protein
Umbilicus
Subcutaneous Fat
Electric Impedance
Hyperglycemia
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Adipose Tissue
Linear Models
Hypersensitivity
Obesity
Tomography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

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title = "GH-binding protein in obese men with varying glucose tolerance: Relationship to body fat distribution, insulin secretion and the GH-IGF-I axis",
abstract = "Bioelectrical impedance for measurement of total body fat and computed tomography for visceral and subcutaneous fat at umbilicus levels were performed in 34 obese and 10 lean men. Insulin secretion in response to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and a GH stimulation test by L-dopa, growth hormone-binding protein (GHBP) and IGF-I were measured. Obese subjects were divided into three groups according to the OGTT. The obese type II diabetes mellitus group had the highest GHBP levels and the most visceral fat. GHBP levels were most strongly correlated with the ratio of visceral fat area to body weight (VWR) above any other parameters (r = 0.725, P < 0.001). The insulin and free fatty acid (FFA) areas under curves (AUC) during the OGTT, and the IGF-I level, were also positively correlated with GHBP levels (r=0.474, P<0.005; r=0.572, P<0.005; r=0.453, P<0.005). GH-AUC to the L-dopa stimulation test was negatively correlated with GHBP levels (r=-0.432, P < 0.005). Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that VWR, FFA- AUC and insulin-AUC significantly contributed to the variability of GHBP (r2= 0.58). In conclusion, we demonstrated that: (i) visceral fat amount mainly determined GHBP levels in obese men with varying glucose tolerance; (ii) hyperglycemia per se did not influence the GHBP level, whereas insulin and FFA could play a role in regulation of GHBP; and (iii) although GH was not the main regulator of GHBP, the unchanged IGF-I level despite GH hyposecretion suggests that increased GHBP levels reflect GH hypersensitivity in order to compensate for decreased GH secretion in obesity.",
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GH-binding protein in obese men with varying glucose tolerance : Relationship to body fat distribution, insulin secretion and the GH-IGF-I axis. / Nam, Su Youn; Kim, Kyung Rae; Song, Young Duk; Lim, Sungkil; Lee, Hyun Chul; Huh, Kap Bum.

In: European Journal of Endocrinology, Vol. 140, No. 2, 01.02.1999, p. 159-163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - GH-binding protein in obese men with varying glucose tolerance

T2 - Relationship to body fat distribution, insulin secretion and the GH-IGF-I axis

AU - Nam, Su Youn

AU - Kim, Kyung Rae

AU - Song, Young Duk

AU - Lim, Sungkil

AU - Lee, Hyun Chul

AU - Huh, Kap Bum

PY - 1999/2/1

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N2 - Bioelectrical impedance for measurement of total body fat and computed tomography for visceral and subcutaneous fat at umbilicus levels were performed in 34 obese and 10 lean men. Insulin secretion in response to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and a GH stimulation test by L-dopa, growth hormone-binding protein (GHBP) and IGF-I were measured. Obese subjects were divided into three groups according to the OGTT. The obese type II diabetes mellitus group had the highest GHBP levels and the most visceral fat. GHBP levels were most strongly correlated with the ratio of visceral fat area to body weight (VWR) above any other parameters (r = 0.725, P < 0.001). The insulin and free fatty acid (FFA) areas under curves (AUC) during the OGTT, and the IGF-I level, were also positively correlated with GHBP levels (r=0.474, P<0.005; r=0.572, P<0.005; r=0.453, P<0.005). GH-AUC to the L-dopa stimulation test was negatively correlated with GHBP levels (r=-0.432, P < 0.005). Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that VWR, FFA- AUC and insulin-AUC significantly contributed to the variability of GHBP (r2= 0.58). In conclusion, we demonstrated that: (i) visceral fat amount mainly determined GHBP levels in obese men with varying glucose tolerance; (ii) hyperglycemia per se did not influence the GHBP level, whereas insulin and FFA could play a role in regulation of GHBP; and (iii) although GH was not the main regulator of GHBP, the unchanged IGF-I level despite GH hyposecretion suggests that increased GHBP levels reflect GH hypersensitivity in order to compensate for decreased GH secretion in obesity.

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