Globalisation and citizenship education

Diversity in South Korean civics textbooks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines how textbooks in the Republic of Korea incorporate liberal, Western notions of diversity and multiculturalism. Through a systematic analysis of 60 civics textbooks over time, this study shows that ideas of multiculturalism and diversity have dramatically increased in the South Korean intended curriculum. While in the past, textbooks depicted South Korean society as racially and ethnically homogenous with little or no mention of disadvantaged groups or ethnic minorities, starting in the 1990s, textbooks increasingly discuss the rights of diverse groups and the need to empower these groups to address problems of social inequality. Yet, traditional citizenship narratives of national homogeneity still remain, especially in textbooks that discuss prospects for the reunification of the Korean peninsula.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)424-439
Number of pages16
JournalComparative Education
Volume49
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Nov 1

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textbook
citizenship
globalization
education
multicultural society
Group
reunification
social inequality
national minority
Korea
republic
narrative
curriculum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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Globalisation and citizenship education : Diversity in South Korean civics textbooks. / Moon, Rennie Jungyean.

In: Comparative Education, Vol. 49, No. 4, 01.11.2013, p. 424-439.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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