Glucose-permeable interpenetrating polymer network hydrogels for corneal implant applications

A pilot study

David Myung, Nabeel Farooqui, Dale Waters, Spencer Schaber, Won-Gun Koh, Michael Carrasco, Jaan Noolandi, Curtis W. Frank, Christopher N. Ta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Epithelialization of a keratoprosthesis requires that the implant material be sufficiently permeable to glucose. We have developed a poly(ethylene glycol)/poly(acrylic acid) (PEG/PAA) interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) hydrogel that can provide adequate passage of glucose from the aqueous humor to the epithelium in vivo. A series of PEG/PAA IPNs with varying PEG macromonomer molecular weights were synthesized and evaluated through swelling studies to determine their water content and diffusion experiments to assess their permeability to glucose. One of the PEG/PAA hydrogels prepared in this study had a glucose diffusion coefficient nearly identical to that of the human cornea (∼ 2.5 × 10- 6 cm2/sec). When implanted intrastromally in rabbit corneas, this hydrogel was retained and well-tolerated in 9 out of 10 cases for a period of 14 days. The retained hydrogels stayed optically clear and the epithelium remained intact and multilayered, indicating that the material facilitated glucose transport from the aqueous humor to the anterior part of the eye. The results from these experiments indicate that PEG/PAA hydrogels are promising candidates for corneal implant applications such as keratoprostheses and intracorneal lenses, and that the PEG/PAA IPN system in general is useful for creating permeable substrates for ophthalmic and other biomedical applications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-43
Number of pages15
JournalCurrent Eye Research
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Jan 1

Fingerprint

carbopol 940
Hydrogels
Ethylene Glycol
Polymers
Glucose
Aqueous Humor
Hydrogel
Cornea
Epithelium
Lenses
Permeability
Molecular Weight
Rabbits
Water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

Myung, David ; Farooqui, Nabeel ; Waters, Dale ; Schaber, Spencer ; Koh, Won-Gun ; Carrasco, Michael ; Noolandi, Jaan ; Frank, Curtis W. ; Ta, Christopher N. / Glucose-permeable interpenetrating polymer network hydrogels for corneal implant applications : A pilot study. In: Current Eye Research. 2008 ; Vol. 33, No. 1. pp. 29-43.
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Myung, D, Farooqui, N, Waters, D, Schaber, S, Koh, W-G, Carrasco, M, Noolandi, J, Frank, CW & Ta, CN 2008, 'Glucose-permeable interpenetrating polymer network hydrogels for corneal implant applications: A pilot study', Current Eye Research, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 29-43. https://doi.org/10.1080/02713680701793930

Glucose-permeable interpenetrating polymer network hydrogels for corneal implant applications : A pilot study. / Myung, David; Farooqui, Nabeel; Waters, Dale; Schaber, Spencer; Koh, Won-Gun; Carrasco, Michael; Noolandi, Jaan; Frank, Curtis W.; Ta, Christopher N.

In: Current Eye Research, Vol. 33, No. 1, 01.01.2008, p. 29-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Myung, David

AU - Farooqui, Nabeel

AU - Waters, Dale

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AU - Frank, Curtis W.

AU - Ta, Christopher N.

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