Group cues and public opposition to immigration: evidence from a survey experiment in South Korea

Shang E. Ha, Soo Jin Cho, Jeong Han Kang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

One view in the study of attitudes towards immigration is that public reactions depend on who the immigrants are. Using a survey experiment, we confirm that group cues matter: South Koreans are more likely to support liberal immigration policies, when immigrants are framed as North Korean defectors (coethnic group). When other groups cues—Korean Chinese (semi-coethnic group) or guest-workers from Indonesia (non-coethnic group)—are given, the level of support becomes significantly lower. Apparently clear evidence on the existence of favouritism towards coethnic group notwithstanding, the relationship between in-group favouritism and immigration threat is not simple, as demonstrated by the finding that individuals exposed to Korean Chinese cues are more likely to feel culturally and socially threatened than those exposed to Indonesian cues. Also, South Koreans experience higher levels of economic threat from North Korean defectors than from Korean Chinese and Indonesians. Additional analysis reveals that ethnic group cues affect public attitudes towards immigration policies not necessarily by heightening perceived threat towards immigrants, but by facilitating individuals’ emotional reactions to them.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)136-149
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jan 2

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South Korea
immigration
opposition
experiment
evidence
Group
immigrant
immigration policy
threat
Experiment
Immigrants
Threat
Immigration
Indonesia
ethnic group
Immigration Policy
worker
economics
experience
Ethnic Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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Group cues and public opposition to immigration : evidence from a survey experiment in South Korea. / Ha, Shang E.; Cho, Soo Jin; Kang, Jeong Han.

In: Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Vol. 42, No. 1, 02.01.2016, p. 136-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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