Having a calling on board: Effects of calling on job satisfaction and job performance among South Korean newcomers

Jiyoung Park, Sinae Kim, Myoungki Lim, Young Woo Sohn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite increasing research on calling, how calling functions for those experiencing transition from school to work and how their calling prior to working relates to later well-being and job outcomes has been understudied. The current study explored effects of perceiving a calling on job satisfaction and job performance, as measured at organizational entry and 2 years after organizational entry. Using a time-lagged collection of a sample of South Korean newcomers, the results based on structural equation modeling revealed that perceiving a calling was positively related to supervisor-rated job performance. Job involvement, which was measured 1 year later, fully mediated the relation between perceiving a calling and job satisfaction, but the hypothesized mediating role of job involvement on the link between perceiving a calling and job performance was not supported. We also examined moderating roles of perceived organizational support and perceived person-job fit on the relation between perceiving a calling on job involvement and found that perceived organizational support facilitated the effects of perceiving a calling on job involvement. Implications of these findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1584
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume10
Issue numberJULY
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Job Satisfaction
Research
Work Performance

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

@article{b44b2289a2da4985af466c1409ce9365,
title = "Having a calling on board: Effects of calling on job satisfaction and job performance among South Korean newcomers",
abstract = "Despite increasing research on calling, how calling functions for those experiencing transition from school to work and how their calling prior to working relates to later well-being and job outcomes has been understudied. The current study explored effects of perceiving a calling on job satisfaction and job performance, as measured at organizational entry and 2 years after organizational entry. Using a time-lagged collection of a sample of South Korean newcomers, the results based on structural equation modeling revealed that perceiving a calling was positively related to supervisor-rated job performance. Job involvement, which was measured 1 year later, fully mediated the relation between perceiving a calling and job satisfaction, but the hypothesized mediating role of job involvement on the link between perceiving a calling and job performance was not supported. We also examined moderating roles of perceived organizational support and perceived person-job fit on the relation between perceiving a calling on job involvement and found that perceived organizational support facilitated the effects of perceiving a calling on job involvement. Implications of these findings are discussed.",
author = "Jiyoung Park and Sinae Kim and Myoungki Lim and Sohn, {Young Woo}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01584",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "Frontiers in Psychology",
issn = "1664-1078",
publisher = "Frontiers Research Foundation",
number = "JULY",

}

Having a calling on board : Effects of calling on job satisfaction and job performance among South Korean newcomers. / Park, Jiyoung; Kim, Sinae; Lim, Myoungki; Sohn, Young Woo.

In: Frontiers in Psychology, Vol. 10, No. JULY, 1584, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Having a calling on board

T2 - Effects of calling on job satisfaction and job performance among South Korean newcomers

AU - Park, Jiyoung

AU - Kim, Sinae

AU - Lim, Myoungki

AU - Sohn, Young Woo

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Despite increasing research on calling, how calling functions for those experiencing transition from school to work and how their calling prior to working relates to later well-being and job outcomes has been understudied. The current study explored effects of perceiving a calling on job satisfaction and job performance, as measured at organizational entry and 2 years after organizational entry. Using a time-lagged collection of a sample of South Korean newcomers, the results based on structural equation modeling revealed that perceiving a calling was positively related to supervisor-rated job performance. Job involvement, which was measured 1 year later, fully mediated the relation between perceiving a calling and job satisfaction, but the hypothesized mediating role of job involvement on the link between perceiving a calling and job performance was not supported. We also examined moderating roles of perceived organizational support and perceived person-job fit on the relation between perceiving a calling on job involvement and found that perceived organizational support facilitated the effects of perceiving a calling on job involvement. Implications of these findings are discussed.

AB - Despite increasing research on calling, how calling functions for those experiencing transition from school to work and how their calling prior to working relates to later well-being and job outcomes has been understudied. The current study explored effects of perceiving a calling on job satisfaction and job performance, as measured at organizational entry and 2 years after organizational entry. Using a time-lagged collection of a sample of South Korean newcomers, the results based on structural equation modeling revealed that perceiving a calling was positively related to supervisor-rated job performance. Job involvement, which was measured 1 year later, fully mediated the relation between perceiving a calling and job satisfaction, but the hypothesized mediating role of job involvement on the link between perceiving a calling and job performance was not supported. We also examined moderating roles of perceived organizational support and perceived person-job fit on the relation between perceiving a calling on job involvement and found that perceived organizational support facilitated the effects of perceiving a calling on job involvement. Implications of these findings are discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85069436145&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85069436145&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01584

DO - 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01584

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85069436145

VL - 10

JO - Frontiers in Psychology

JF - Frontiers in Psychology

SN - 1664-1078

IS - JULY

M1 - 1584

ER -