Healthcare spending and performance of specialty hospitals: Nationwide evidence from olorectal-anal specialty hospitals in South Korea

Sun Jung Kim, Sang Gyu Lee, Tae Hyun Kim, Eun Cheol Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Aim of this study is to investigate the characteristics and performance of colorectal-anal specialty vs. general hospitals for South Korean inpatients with colorectal-anal diseases, and assesses the short-term designation effect of the government’s specialty hospital. Materials and Methods: Nationwide all colorectal-anal disease inpatient claims (n=292158) for 2010–2012 were used to investigate length of stay and inpatient charges for surgical and medical procedures in specialty vs. general hospitals. The patients’ claim data were matched to hospital data, and multi-level linear mixed models to account for clustering of patients within hospitals were performed. Results: Inpatient charges at colorectal-anal specialty hospitals were 27% greater per case and 92% greater per day than those at small general hospitals, but the average length of stay was 49% shorter. Colorectal-anal specialty hospitals had shorter length of stay and a higher inpatient charges per day for both surgical and medical procedures, but per case charges were not significantly different. A “specialty” designation effect also found that the colorectal-anal specialty hospitals may have consciously attempted to reduce their length of stay and inpatient charges. Both hospital and patient level factors had significant roles in determining length of stay and inpatient charges. Conclusion: Colorectal-anal specialty hospitals have shorter length of stay and higher inpatient charges per day than small general hospitals. A “specialty” designation by government influence performance and healthcare spending of hospitals as well. In order to maintain prosperous specialty hospital system, investigation into additional factors that affect performance, such as quality of care and patient satisfaction should be carried out.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1721-1730
Number of pages10
JournalYonsei medical journal
Volume56
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Nov

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Republic of Korea
Inpatients
Delivery of Health Care
Length of Stay
General Hospitals
Quality of Health Care
Patient Satisfaction
Cluster Analysis
Linear Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Healthcare spending and performance of specialty hospitals: Nationwide evidence from olorectal-anal specialty hospitals in South Korea",
abstract = "Purpose: Aim of this study is to investigate the characteristics and performance of colorectal-anal specialty vs. general hospitals for South Korean inpatients with colorectal-anal diseases, and assesses the short-term designation effect of the government’s specialty hospital. Materials and Methods: Nationwide all colorectal-anal disease inpatient claims (n=292158) for 2010–2012 were used to investigate length of stay and inpatient charges for surgical and medical procedures in specialty vs. general hospitals. The patients’ claim data were matched to hospital data, and multi-level linear mixed models to account for clustering of patients within hospitals were performed. Results: Inpatient charges at colorectal-anal specialty hospitals were 27{\%} greater per case and 92{\%} greater per day than those at small general hospitals, but the average length of stay was 49{\%} shorter. Colorectal-anal specialty hospitals had shorter length of stay and a higher inpatient charges per day for both surgical and medical procedures, but per case charges were not significantly different. A “specialty” designation effect also found that the colorectal-anal specialty hospitals may have consciously attempted to reduce their length of stay and inpatient charges. Both hospital and patient level factors had significant roles in determining length of stay and inpatient charges. Conclusion: Colorectal-anal specialty hospitals have shorter length of stay and higher inpatient charges per day than small general hospitals. A “specialty” designation by government influence performance and healthcare spending of hospitals as well. In order to maintain prosperous specialty hospital system, investigation into additional factors that affect performance, such as quality of care and patient satisfaction should be carried out.",
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Healthcare spending and performance of specialty hospitals : Nationwide evidence from olorectal-anal specialty hospitals in South Korea. / Kim, Sun Jung; Lee, Sang Gyu; Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Eun Cheol.

In: Yonsei medical journal, Vol. 56, No. 6, 11.2015, p. 1721-1730.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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