Hepatoprotective effect of licorice, the root of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fischer, in alcohol-induced fatty liver disease

Jae Chul Jung, Yun-Hee Lee, Sou Hyun Kim, Keuk Jun Kim, Kyung Mi Kim, Seikwan Oh, Young Suk Jung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Our previous study suggested that licorice has anti-inflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated microglial cells and anti-oxidative activity in tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced oxidative liver damage. In this study, we evaluated the effect of licorice on chronic alcohol-induced fatty liver injury mediated by inflammation and oxidative stress. Methods: Raw licorice was extracted, and quantitative and qualitative analysis of its components was performed by using LC-MS/MS. Mice were fed a liquid alcohol diet with or without licorice for 4weeks. Results: We have standardized 70% fermented ethanol extracted licorice and confirmed by LC-MS/MS as glycyrrhizic acid (GA), 15.77±0.34μg/mg; liquiritin (LQ), 14.55±0.42μg/mg; and liquiritigenin (LG), 1.34±0.02μg/mg, respectively. Alcohol consumption increased serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities and the levels of triglycerides and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-aα. Lipid accumulation in the liver was also markedly induced, whereas the glutathione level was reduced. All these alcohol-induced changes were effectively inhibited by licorice treatment. In particular, the hepatic glutathione level was restored and alcohol-induced TNF-aα production was significantly inhibited by licorice. Conclusion: Taken together, our data suggests that protective effect of licorice against alcohol-induced liver injury may be attributed to its anti-inflammatory activity and enhancement of antioxidant defense.

Original languageEnglish
Article number19
JournalBMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jan 22

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Glycyrrhiza uralensis
Glycyrrhiza
Fatty Liver
Liver Diseases
Alcohols
Liver
Glutathione
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Glycyrrhizic Acid
tert-Butylhydroperoxide
Wounds and Injuries
Aspartate Aminotransferases
Alanine Transaminase
Alcohol Drinking
Lipopolysaccharides
Triglycerides
Oxidative Stress
Ethanol
Antioxidants

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

Jung, Jae Chul ; Lee, Yun-Hee ; Kim, Sou Hyun ; Kim, Keuk Jun ; Kim, Kyung Mi ; Oh, Seikwan ; Jung, Young Suk. / Hepatoprotective effect of licorice, the root of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fischer, in alcohol-induced fatty liver disease. In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 16, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background: Our previous study suggested that licorice has anti-inflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated microglial cells and anti-oxidative activity in tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced oxidative liver damage. In this study, we evaluated the effect of licorice on chronic alcohol-induced fatty liver injury mediated by inflammation and oxidative stress. Methods: Raw licorice was extracted, and quantitative and qualitative analysis of its components was performed by using LC-MS/MS. Mice were fed a liquid alcohol diet with or without licorice for 4weeks. Results: We have standardized 70{\%} fermented ethanol extracted licorice and confirmed by LC-MS/MS as glycyrrhizic acid (GA), 15.77±0.34μg/mg; liquiritin (LQ), 14.55±0.42μg/mg; and liquiritigenin (LG), 1.34±0.02μg/mg, respectively. Alcohol consumption increased serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities and the levels of triglycerides and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-aα. Lipid accumulation in the liver was also markedly induced, whereas the glutathione level was reduced. All these alcohol-induced changes were effectively inhibited by licorice treatment. In particular, the hepatic glutathione level was restored and alcohol-induced TNF-aα production was significantly inhibited by licorice. Conclusion: Taken together, our data suggests that protective effect of licorice against alcohol-induced liver injury may be attributed to its anti-inflammatory activity and enhancement of antioxidant defense.",
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Hepatoprotective effect of licorice, the root of Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fischer, in alcohol-induced fatty liver disease. / Jung, Jae Chul; Lee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Sou Hyun; Kim, Keuk Jun; Kim, Kyung Mi; Oh, Seikwan; Jung, Young Suk.

In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Vol. 16, No. 1, 19, 22.01.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Jung, Jae Chul

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AU - Kim, Kyung Mi

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AU - Jung, Young Suk

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AB - Background: Our previous study suggested that licorice has anti-inflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated microglial cells and anti-oxidative activity in tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced oxidative liver damage. In this study, we evaluated the effect of licorice on chronic alcohol-induced fatty liver injury mediated by inflammation and oxidative stress. Methods: Raw licorice was extracted, and quantitative and qualitative analysis of its components was performed by using LC-MS/MS. Mice were fed a liquid alcohol diet with or without licorice for 4weeks. Results: We have standardized 70% fermented ethanol extracted licorice and confirmed by LC-MS/MS as glycyrrhizic acid (GA), 15.77±0.34μg/mg; liquiritin (LQ), 14.55±0.42μg/mg; and liquiritigenin (LG), 1.34±0.02μg/mg, respectively. Alcohol consumption increased serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities and the levels of triglycerides and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-aα. Lipid accumulation in the liver was also markedly induced, whereas the glutathione level was reduced. All these alcohol-induced changes were effectively inhibited by licorice treatment. In particular, the hepatic glutathione level was restored and alcohol-induced TNF-aα production was significantly inhibited by licorice. Conclusion: Taken together, our data suggests that protective effect of licorice against alcohol-induced liver injury may be attributed to its anti-inflammatory activity and enhancement of antioxidant defense.

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