Heterogeneity in costs and prognosis for acute ischemic stroke treatment by comorbidities

Euna Han, Tae Hyun Kim, Heejo Koo, Joonsang Yoo, Jihoe Heo, Hyo Suk Nam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Comorbidities are prevalent among stroke patients. The current study assesses the variations in cost and stroke prognosis by concurrent comorbidities in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods: The Charlson comorbidity index was used as the composite comorbidity level (0 none, 1 mild, 2 moderate, and ≥ 3 severe). Outcomes included modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 3 months and 1-year mortality and stroke recurrence. We utilized a multivariate log-normal model for cost, a proportional Cox hazards model for outcomes, and a decision analytic model for the excess cost per unit change in outcome probability compared with the no-comorbidity group. Results: A total of 3605 consecutive patients were enrolled. At 3 months, the severe comorbidity group was 0.32 times less likely to have mRS ≤ 2, and were 4.86 times more likely to die from stroke than the no-comorbidity group. Within 1 year, the severe comorbidity group showed 10.36 and 3.38 times higher likelihoods of death from stroke and stroke recurrence than the no-comorbidity group. The incremental cost was 4376 in 3 months and 7074 USD in 1 year for the severe comorbidity group, and 985 in 3 months and 1265 USD in 1 year for the mild comorbidity group compared to the no-comorbidity group. Conclusion: The excess cost per unit increase of a short-term good prognosis was largest for the severe comorbidity group. Patients with severe comorbidities showed poor prognosis and large health expenditure. Assessing comorbidity level is crucial for better prediction of outcomes and excess cost.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Neurology
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

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Comorbidity
Stroke
Costs and Cost Analysis
Therapeutics
Recurrence
Health Expenditures
Proportional Hazards Models

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Han, Euna ; Kim, Tae Hyun ; Koo, Heejo ; Yoo, Joonsang ; Heo, Jihoe ; Nam, Hyo Suk. / Heterogeneity in costs and prognosis for acute ischemic stroke treatment by comorbidities. In: Journal of Neurology. 2019.
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Heterogeneity in costs and prognosis for acute ischemic stroke treatment by comorbidities. / Han, Euna; Kim, Tae Hyun; Koo, Heejo; Yoo, Joonsang; Heo, Jihoe; Nam, Hyo Suk.

In: Journal of Neurology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Heterogeneity in costs and prognosis for acute ischemic stroke treatment by comorbidities

AU - Han, Euna

AU - Kim, Tae Hyun

AU - Koo, Heejo

AU - Yoo, Joonsang

AU - Heo, Jihoe

AU - Nam, Hyo Suk

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N2 - Objective: Comorbidities are prevalent among stroke patients. The current study assesses the variations in cost and stroke prognosis by concurrent comorbidities in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods: The Charlson comorbidity index was used as the composite comorbidity level (0 none, 1 mild, 2 moderate, and ≥ 3 severe). Outcomes included modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 3 months and 1-year mortality and stroke recurrence. We utilized a multivariate log-normal model for cost, a proportional Cox hazards model for outcomes, and a decision analytic model for the excess cost per unit change in outcome probability compared with the no-comorbidity group. Results: A total of 3605 consecutive patients were enrolled. At 3 months, the severe comorbidity group was 0.32 times less likely to have mRS ≤ 2, and were 4.86 times more likely to die from stroke than the no-comorbidity group. Within 1 year, the severe comorbidity group showed 10.36 and 3.38 times higher likelihoods of death from stroke and stroke recurrence than the no-comorbidity group. The incremental cost was 4376 in 3 months and 7074 USD in 1 year for the severe comorbidity group, and 985 in 3 months and 1265 USD in 1 year for the mild comorbidity group compared to the no-comorbidity group. Conclusion: The excess cost per unit increase of a short-term good prognosis was largest for the severe comorbidity group. Patients with severe comorbidities showed poor prognosis and large health expenditure. Assessing comorbidity level is crucial for better prediction of outcomes and excess cost.

AB - Objective: Comorbidities are prevalent among stroke patients. The current study assesses the variations in cost and stroke prognosis by concurrent comorbidities in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods: The Charlson comorbidity index was used as the composite comorbidity level (0 none, 1 mild, 2 moderate, and ≥ 3 severe). Outcomes included modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 3 months and 1-year mortality and stroke recurrence. We utilized a multivariate log-normal model for cost, a proportional Cox hazards model for outcomes, and a decision analytic model for the excess cost per unit change in outcome probability compared with the no-comorbidity group. Results: A total of 3605 consecutive patients were enrolled. At 3 months, the severe comorbidity group was 0.32 times less likely to have mRS ≤ 2, and were 4.86 times more likely to die from stroke than the no-comorbidity group. Within 1 year, the severe comorbidity group showed 10.36 and 3.38 times higher likelihoods of death from stroke and stroke recurrence than the no-comorbidity group. The incremental cost was 4376 in 3 months and 7074 USD in 1 year for the severe comorbidity group, and 985 in 3 months and 1265 USD in 1 year for the mild comorbidity group compared to the no-comorbidity group. Conclusion: The excess cost per unit increase of a short-term good prognosis was largest for the severe comorbidity group. Patients with severe comorbidities showed poor prognosis and large health expenditure. Assessing comorbidity level is crucial for better prediction of outcomes and excess cost.

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