Heterogeneity of Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin B Resistance Phenotypes in Enterococci

Yu Hong Min, Jae Hee Jeong, Yun Jeong Choi, Hee Jeong Yun, Kyungwon Lee, Mi Ja Shim, Jin Hwan Kwak, Eung Chil Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We determined the macrolide resistance phenotypes of 241 clinical isolates of erythromycin-resistant enterococci (MICs, ≥1 μg/ml), including 147 Enterococcus faecalis strains and 94 Enterococcus faecium strains, collected from a hospital in Seoul, Korea, between 1999 and 2000. By the erythromycin (40 μg)-josamycin (100 μg) double-disk test, 93 strains were assigned to the constitutive macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance (cMLSB) phenotype, and the remaining 148 strains were assigned to the inducible MLSB resistance (iMLSB) phenotype. Of the strains with the iMLSB phenotype, 36 exhibited a reversibly inducible MLSB (riMLSB) phenotype, i.e., blunting of the erythromycin zone of inhibition, which indicates that the 16-membered-ring macrolide josamycin is a more effective inducer than the 14-membered-ring macrolide erythromycin. Sequence analysis of the regulatory regions of the erm(B) genes from all of the strains exhibiting the riMLS B phenotype revealed not only erm(Bv) [where v represents variant; previously erm (AMR)] (n = 13), as reported previously, but also three kinds of erm(B) variants, which were designated erm(Bv1) (n = 17), erm(Bv2) (n = 3), and erm(Bv3) (n = 3), respectively. In lacZ reporter gene assays of these variants, the 16-membered-ring macrolide tylosin had stronger inducibility than erythromycin at 20.1 μg/ml. These findings highlight the versatility of erm(B) in induction specificity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3415-3420
Number of pages6
JournalAntimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
Volume47
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Nov 1

Fingerprint

Streptogramin B
Lincosamides
Macrolides
Enterococcus
Erythromycin
Phenotype
Josamycin
Tylosin
Enterococcus faecium
Lac Operon
Enterococcus faecalis
Nucleic Acid Regulatory Sequences
Korea
Reporter Genes
Sequence Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Min, Yu Hong ; Jeong, Jae Hee ; Choi, Yun Jeong ; Yun, Hee Jeong ; Lee, Kyungwon ; Shim, Mi Ja ; Kwak, Jin Hwan ; Choi, Eung Chil. / Heterogeneity of Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin B Resistance Phenotypes in Enterococci. In: Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy. 2003 ; Vol. 47, No. 11. pp. 3415-3420.
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Heterogeneity of Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin B Resistance Phenotypes in Enterococci. / Min, Yu Hong; Jeong, Jae Hee; Choi, Yun Jeong; Yun, Hee Jeong; Lee, Kyungwon; Shim, Mi Ja; Kwak, Jin Hwan; Choi, Eung Chil.

In: Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy, Vol. 47, No. 11, 01.11.2003, p. 3415-3420.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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